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Q&A: New Detroit superintendent Nikolai Vitti on living in Detroit and first steps

Nikolai Vitti, superintendent for Detroit Public Schools

 

This article originally appeared in Chalkbeat Detroit.

Detroit's next schools superintendent has arrived in the city and has a long to-do list for his first few weeks.

Among priorities: Finding a house in the city, checking out schools for his four children and—possibly—finding a role for interim superintendent Alycia Meriweather in his new administration.

"I've been impressed with the work that she's done as interim superintendent," Nikolai Vitti told Chalkbeat in a phone interview Saturday, a day after the Detroit school board approved a five-year contract that will pay him $295,000 in his first year and up to $322,000 in later years.

"I think she has been a great ambassador for the city and the district and the children and I believe there's a place for her on the team," he said. "I just have to get to know her better and understand the right fit for her."

Meriweather, who has been a popular interim superintendent, had broad support from teachers, parents and administrators when she applied for the permanent job. Her supporters were angry when she was wasn't included among the finalists.

She did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Saturday. Vitti said the two have not yet met.

The school board last month chose Vitti to run the 40,000-student Detroit Public Schools Community District. He was the superintendent of the 130,000-student Duval County Public Schools in Jacksonville, Florida. His last day on the job there was May 21.

Vitti's contract formally begins on July 1 but the Dearborn Heights native said he would arrive in Detroit early the week of May 22nd.

He'll be bouncing back and forth between Detroit and Jacksonville as his children finish out the school year in Florida. His goal, he said, is to permanently move his family to Michigan in mid-June.

"The first couple of weeks for me will be focused on engagement with district staff, school staff—including principals and teachers— and then external engagement with parents and elected officials at the city and state level to really understand what’s working and what we need to do differently."

Vitti said he plans to live in the city, not the suburbs, and hopes to enroll his four elementary- and middle-school-aged children in public schools. But the fact that two of them have dyslexia could complicate his school search, he said.

"It's just a matter of finding the right match," he said. "A couple of my children have … special needs and I want to make sure it’s the right fit at that level."

In Jacksonville, Vitti created a special school for children with dyslexia (as well as one for kids with autism) and said he'd eventually like to do something similar in Detroit.

"Most public schools systems don't have the kinds of services that are really about meeting dyslexic learners' individual needs," he said. "I wouldn't say that is specific to Detroit."

A school for dyslexic learners would not only serve Detroit kids, he said. He believes such a school could be a draw for families from around the region who are looking for a specialized program.

"Statistically, 1 in 5 children face dyslexia and that number can be even greater for those growing up in poverty," Vitti said. "Their needs are not met even more because they’re growing up in poverty."

The Detroit district has many challenges including a severe teacher shortage that will need to be addressed but Vitti said he'll set priorities over the next few weeks based on what he learns as he gets to know the district.

"I really want to hear from people in the district," he said. "I really look forward to getting out to schools and setting aside some time to meet with teachers and hearing directly from them about what's working, what's not, and what we need to do differently."

Chalkbeat is a nonprofit news site covering educational change in public schools.

Erin Einhorn is the Chalkbeat Detroit editor. She's written for The Atlantic, The Nation and Time and has contributed to the public radio program This American Life.

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