| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter Vimeo RSS Feed

Buzz

3080 Articles | Page: | Show All

Conde Nast Traveller checks in on Detroit food scene

We're happy anytime we see a story about lovely foodie things happening in Detroit neighbourhoods using British English spellings.

An excerpt from Conde Nast Traveller:

One neighbourhood that's booming is Corktown, a previously near-deserted stretch of Michigan Avenue in the shadow of the abandoned Michigan Central Station. Now it's bustling with the likes of craft-beer specialist Slows Bar B Q, coffee shop Astro, and new Italian restaurant Ottava Via. Other newcomers include Two James, the first distillery to open in Detroit since before Prohibition, which sells a range of handcrafted vodka, gin, bourbon and whiskey. Order the bourbon-based Corktown Flip at its industrial-style bar. Gold Cash Gold, a restaurant opening this summer in a former pawn shop, shows how far the area is transforming.

Read more here.

Global Detroit audio: Thoughts on Gov. Snyder's immigration initiative

Steve Tobocman, director of Global Detroit, makes a strong case that not only could the city use highly-skilled, college educated immigrants -- which Gov. Snyder outlined in his recent State of the State address -- but that the city needs more working class foreign-born newcomers as a way to revitalize the local economy.

Check out this audio report on Michigan Radio. Mighty important stuff, indeed. Listen here.

Shinola to wind up four big clocks downtown

Ever since hitting the ground running in Detroit a couple years ago, Shinola has not failed to amaze with its marketing acumen. Take this latest move, to place four big clocks in strategic downtown locations. We like what Curbed has to say about that in this excerpt:

The sidewalks of Detroit will sprout four 13' street clocks by the beginning of March, courtesy of an interesting marketing move by Detroit's local watchmaker/voluntary cheerleader, Shinola. The permanent fixtures are meant to replicate the design of the company's new pocket watch, which is meant to replicate an era when people actually used pocket watches.

Read on here.

Calling all artists: Apply now to do creative makeover of viaducts

Midtown Detroit, Inc. (MDI) in partnership with the New Economy Initiative (NEI) is seeking proposals to transform the undersides of two viaducts located in Midtown Detroit’s TechTown district with public art and light. MDI is pleased to announce that its Call for Entries is now open.

The Second and Cass Avenue viaducts are two fully operational railroad bridge grade separations located between Baltimore and Amsterdam Streets in TechTown. Originally constructed in 1934, these once magnificent viaducts have been poorly maintained over the years and lack adequate lighting, contributing to unsafe perceptions of the district. This call seeks to give these industrial bridges new life—making them a choice destination rather than a place to pass through.

Accepted proposals will be funded up to $75,000 per viaduct. Applicants may provide proposals for either one or both viaducts. If applying for both viaducts, proposals may treat each viaduct as two separate installations or visually connect the two viaducts with a cohesive design.

The deadline for all applications is April 30.

More details here.

Detroit Party Marching Band home from EU blast

One of Detroit’s biggest bands, literally speaking, just got back from their first European tour. The 30 strong Detroit Party Marching Band played four shows over the course of a week in Holland. They also just played a welcome-home gig at the Trumbullplex in Woodbridge.

John Notarianni, media specialist for Model D's parent company Issue Media Group, and Jason Marker are in the band. They spoke with WDET's Travis Wright.

Listen in here.

Live chat today with Freep's John Gallagher and sociologist Thomas Sugrue

Join a live chat with Tom Sugrue, director of the Penn Social Science and Policy Forum at the University of Pennsylvania and author of "The Origins of the Urban Crisis," and John Gallagher of the Detroit Free Press. Sugrue is an expert on the history of Detroit deindustrialization and the dynamics of race in the city.

The live chat begins today (Feb. 25) at noon. Start posting questions here now.

Richard Florida: Why gayborhoods matter

Not since the heyday of Palmer Park in the 1970s and 1980s has Detroit had its own gayborhood. We've long believed in the economic and cultural benefits of such 'hoods. So does Richard Florida, in this excerpt from Atlantic Cities:

Economists have long speculated about the effects of gayborhoods on everything from diversity to gentrification to housing prices. One common theme of this analysis is that neighborhoods with a higher than average density of gay residents are by definition more diverse and open-minded, with a wider range of racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups as well. Another common argument is that gays often pioneer the revitalization of disadvantaged, crime-filled urban neighborhoods – and their presence can be seen as an early marker of gentrification and a precursor to a jump in housing prices.

Did he just say gentrification? Why yes, yes he did.

Read more here.

Curbed Detroit updates Gar Building progress

It's good to get a progress report on the rehab of one of Detroit's most fascinating turnaround building projects, as seen in Curbed Detroit:

Where most people saw an abandoned castle with an attic full of bird turds, local production company Mindfield saw office space. Roughly two years have passed since we first wrote about the impending renovation. According to the original timeline, the GAR should be little more than a good Swiftering away from its debut. Alas, intense renovation work continues, with an updated goal of opening this fall.

Read more here.

VoteForDetroit.com to give 'Move to Detroit' presentation at SXSW

By the time this year’s SXSW-Interactive in Austin begins in early March, Lowe Campbell Ewald will have moved over 500 employees to Detroit. The advertising firm will be doing a 'Move to Detroit' presentation at the festival in the Texas capital. See an excerpt below:  

Despite what you might read in the media, Detroit is quickly becoming rich in creativity, innovation and inspiration. In fact, Detroit was one of seven North American cities selected to be part of Google’s Tech Hub Network, and with tech investors like Detroit Venture Partners, it's becoming easy for startups to create opportunities. And in Detroit, everything needs help, so there are endless opportunities.

With a "we're all in this together" mentality, everyone is becoming friends and utilizing their skills to not only help one another, but define Detroit's future. Whether you're a designer, an innovator, an entrepreneur or an investor, the talent is moving to Detroit. And so should you.

Read more at VoteForDetroit.com here.

Henry Ford Academy students receive scholastic art awards

Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies (HFA: SCS) middle and high school students received 21 regional Scholastic Art Awards during an award ceremony at the Detroit Institute of Arts! Detroit Film Theater on Feb. 12. In addition to earning a significant total number of awards, for the first time an HFA: SCS student has also attained the highest regional award and will represent the school on the national level.

The Southeastern Michigan Region of the Scholastic Art Awards received more than 5,500 individual works of art from middle school and high school students and 291 senior portfolios, which were then judged in a blind process and selected for Honorable Mentions, Silver and Gold Key Awards, American Vision nominations, and Best of Show Portfolios.
 
Joshua Rainer, 12th grade, is one of five young area artists who will represent the region on the national level as American Vision nominees, chosen as Best of Show from all of the artwork entered in this year's Southeastern Michigan regional competition. Each regional program across the country selects the five most outstanding works of art from their Gold Key recipients. These five young artists represent the region on the national level as American Vision nominees. A national panel selects one of the nominated works from each region as the American Vision Award Recipient for 2014. Each of these selected artists will receive a gold medal at the national ceremony held in New York City. 
 
At a time when many schools have cut visual arts programs, all students at the tuition-free college prep middle/high school engage in intensive art and design course work, with curriculum and instruction developed in partnership with the College for Creative Studies. HFA: SCS students won eighteen individual awards in a range of media categories, including:

Gold Key
John Griffith - Painting
Mark Hall - Photography
Deja Jones - Fashion (2)
Joshua Rainer - Painting (3)
Jaylen Tate-Lucas - Mixed Media
Joshua Williams - Drawing

Silver Key
Rachel Fernandez - Photography
Mark Hall - Photography (2)
Franchesca Lamarre - Fashion
Morgan Parker - Photography
Joshua Rainer - Painting

Honorable Mention
Naomi Cook - Painting
Deja Jones - Fashion
Joshua Williams - Drawing

Franchesca Lamarre and Joshua Rainer also received Gold Keys for their Senior Art Portfolios, which are a critical body of work for any student pursuing post-secondary education in a creative field.


New America Media: Immigrants key to Detroit revival

This report in New America Media, especpially the following three paragraphs, caught our eye last week. Who can doubt that welcoming immigrant communities to Detroit is an excellent idea? 

An excerpt:

While Detroit’s population has gone down by about 26 percent, the Latino population, particularly in the southeast side of the city, known as "Mexicantown," continues to rise, along with Latino-owned businesses.

Over the last two decades, according to census data, Detroit’s Latino population nearly doubled to 50,000 in 2010. Latinos in the city are also fairly young, with a median age of 24. 

According to an Associated Press report, more than $200 million in the past 15 years has been invested in Mexicantown, a few miles from downtown Detroit. This investment has attracted more restaurants, retail stores, and new residential buildings, including an $11 million condominium development.

Read more here.

Duggan and Obama meet, talk jobs for Detroit

The Freep reports that Obama and Duggan were joined at the lunch by White House Senior Adviser Valerie Jarrett and Don Graves, Senior Adviser at the National Economic Council. 

Duggan said he didn’t ask the president for money but instead was talking about strategies to create more jobs.

He wouldn’t specify what ideas he talked about with Obama, saying he wants to present them in detail to the president first.
But Duggan mentioned his administration has a request in for more buses because "we've got to get people to these jobs."

Read the entire story here.

We'll drink to that: Hopcat to open at M-1 Rail stop

The building at 4265 Woodward (most recently inhabited by Agave) is being converted into the new Detroit home for HopCat, which will become city’s largest beer bar featuring 130 taps with an emphasis on Michigan craft beers.

The business is reportedly investing $3.3 million into the building at the southwest corner of Woodward and Canfield, vacant since 2006. The location is where a stop on the M-1 Rail streetcar line will be.

The Detroit location will feature an outdoor beer garden and live music. Read more here.

#DetroitWeek of entrepreneurship and innovation up and running

#DetroitWeek, which began yesterday and runs through Feb. 23 is being called a "celebration of entrepreneurship and innovation" It's a week packed with cool stuff. Take a look at the calendar of events planned for downtown and Midtown. 

We caught up to Hajj Flemings, a personal brand strategist and founder/CEO of Brand Camp University who is running the festival for a short Q&A: 

How did the idea for Detroit Week originate?
 
The idea for Detroit Week was birthed from a phone call my co-founder, Delane Parnell, and I had with IBM (one of our partners) about co-organizing a few events for National Entrepreneurship Week. Unfortunately, the plans fell through and after an internal discussion we decided to create a platform that could interconnect the city's tech and broader business community while unifying the local support organizations.
 
What are the goals you hope to achieve after a week of activities, events, discussions?
 
Our goals are synonymous with everything we do; we want to inspire people to follow their passions, connect members of the community with each other, help shift our city's culture from developing ideas to creating products, and facilitate partnerships between local support organizations. Although Detroit Week will end on Feb. 23, our mission won't stop there. Throughout the year we plan to continue introducing programs, events, and activities to the community that will amplify and further the dialogue around entrepreneurship and technology throughout the entire state of Michigan. But as far as Detroit, Mayor Duggan said it best, we're open for business.

Model D will be hosting a featured #DetroitWeek event. Join us Feb. 20 for a happy hour at the Model D House (4470 Second Ave., Detroit), 5:30 - 7 p.m. RSVP Here.

Queer Detroit underground: Carleton Gholz of DSC on forgotten innovators of techno

When club kids and other music peeps need to know which way is up or down in global dance culture they turn to Resident Advisor, which has editorial outposts in Berlin, London and Tokyo.

We found this recent piece on LGBT influence on the international scene on RA especially fine, with insights by Carleton Gholz of the Detroit Sound Conservancy on the origins of Detroit Techno particularly perceptive. Gholz is currently finishing up a post-doctoral teaching gig in Boston - not to mention finishing his book, Out Come the Freaks: Electronic Dance Music and the Making of Detroit after Motown - and moving back to Detroit where he belongs this spring. Dude, welcome back. 

No spoliers, just read the whole beautiful damn thing here.
3080 Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts