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Hell yeah, Hamtramck!

Blowing up this week on Facebook, this gem of a list features many of our favorite Hamtown spots, including the underrated Krakus Polish restaraunt (people, just go; it's actiually in Detroit, just north of the Hamtramck city limits), Recycled Treasures, B&H Bar & Grill (one of two Bosnian-owned food businesses on Caniff), Planet Ant Theatre, Srodek's Quality Sausage (ask for the blood sausage, called kieska in Polish), Lo & Behold and Public Pool. Oh, hell, here are the other gems in the story: Hamtramck Disneyland, St. Florian Church, New Palace Bakery and the Detroit Zen Center. That makes 10. All great.

Read all about it here.

Techno titan Carl Craig talks to Thump about Detroit

OK, the interviewer misidentifies the Packard Plant as "a club," but it's a forgivable error in an otherwise solid Q&A with the west side kid from Cooley High who started and continues to run Planet E records, one of the most influential labels in global techno. 

An excerpt:

THUMP: The film mentions Packard, a club at which Richie Hawtin was closely tied to. Did you have much to do with the Packard, or other Detroit parties like the Music Institute? What were those parties like, and how did the Music Institute differ from other parties, including Packard, at the time?
 
Carl Craig: The parties at the Music Institute came before the parties at the Packard Plant. I came in as a spectator, as a music lover for the Music Institute after it had started. That was Derrick May, George Baker, and Alton Miller that were involved in that. The Music Institute was my music education. It was the closest thing to having a Paradise Garage or a Music Box in Detroit. The Packard was also the result of the Music Institute not being around anymore. It moved a couple of doors down, but it was never the same.

Read more here.

Model D and the Nain Rouge take over Great Lakes Coffee

On the eve of this Sunday's Marche du Nain Rouge, join us for Another Last Temptation of the Nain Rouge.

Last year you joined us for the Nain's last hurrah at the Model D house. Well, it's his last, last hurrah. But maybe not.
 
This year the harbinger of doom has decided to enjoy his last night of debauchery at Great Lakes Coffee with rouge libations, a dance party, and a toast! 
 
Join us Saturday, March 22 from 7 to 11 p.m. at Great Lakes Coffee for a final frolic before we bid farewell to Detroit's dastardly devil at the Marche de le Nain Rouge on Sunday. 
 
In case you're wondering, yes, our DJs promise to bring the appropropriate bloodlust to the proceedings.

They are:
Walter Wasacz of nospectacle
Matthew Lewis
Soul Deep's Mike Dutkewych
 
Toast promptly at 9 p.m. by Hidden History of Detroit Author Amy Elliott Bragg.
 
Sip on the Nain's favorite, "The Beetdown" featuring Blue Nectar Tequila & Mcclary Bros. carrot-beet shrubs.
 

Freep Film Fest features Michigan-based docs, panel discussions March 20-23

This much anticpated inaugural event kicks off this Thursday (March 20) and runs through Sunday (March 23) focusing on Detroit- and Michigan-themed documentaries.
 
Screenings are being held at the Fillmore Detroit and Detroit Film Theatre at the Detroit Institute of Arts. You can view the full lineup with quick descriptions of all the films here.
 
There are tons of highlights to pick from on the schedule, but here are some you may want to circle:
 
• Following the "Packard: The Last Shift" premiere Thursday evening, there is a panel discussion including new Packard Plant owner Fernando Palazuelo; Roger M. Luksik, president of the Packard Motor Car Foundation; Dan Kinkead, director of projects for Detroit Future City Implementation Office, and “Packard: The Last Shift” director Brian Kaufman. It will be moderated by Free Press business columnist Tom Walsh.
• On Friday evening, the screening of "Do You Think a Job is the Answer?" will be followed by a discussion led by Free Press editorial page editor Stephen Henderson. Panelists will include producer-director Gary Gilson; Tonya Allen, president of the Skillman Foundation; Pamela J. Moore, president and CEO of Detroit Employment Solutions Corp., and William F. Jones, CEO of Focus: HOPE.
• After "Lean, Mean & Green" on Sunday afternoon, a panel will be moderated by Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley and include director Carrie LeZotte; the Free Press' John Gallagher, who is a co-producer; Riet Schumack, co-founder and program coordinator Neighbors Building Brightmoor; Kenneth Cockrel, Jr., executive director of Detroit Future City’s Implementation Office and Adam Hollier, vice president of Hantz Woodlands.

Everything you need to know is packed in here

Detroit, oui: In French, Le Figaro waxes cool about the city

Some great Detroit peeps and locations -- including artists Shades, Rob Smith, Chris Turner, Thornetta Davis and the Blackman, Detroit Farm & Garden's Jeff Klein, and the Packard Plant -- make an appearance in this piece (only in French). Wonderful photography by former Model D lensman Dave Krieger.

See it here.

Conde Nast Traveller checks in on Detroit food scene

We're happy anytime we see a story about lovely foodie things happening in Detroit neighbourhoods using British English spellings.

An excerpt from Conde Nast Traveller:

One neighbourhood that's booming is Corktown, a previously near-deserted stretch of Michigan Avenue in the shadow of the abandoned Michigan Central Station. Now it's bustling with the likes of craft-beer specialist Slows Bar B Q, coffee shop Astro, and new Italian restaurant Ottava Via. Other newcomers include Two James, the first distillery to open in Detroit since before Prohibition, which sells a range of handcrafted vodka, gin, bourbon and whiskey. Order the bourbon-based Corktown Flip at its industrial-style bar. Gold Cash Gold, a restaurant opening this summer in a former pawn shop, shows how far the area is transforming.

Read more here.

We'll drink to that: Hopcat to open at M-1 Rail stop

The building at 4265 Woodward (most recently inhabited by Agave) is being converted into the new Detroit home for HopCat, which will become city’s largest beer bar featuring 130 taps with an emphasis on Michigan craft beers.

The business is reportedly investing $3.3 million into the building at the southwest corner of Woodward and Canfield, vacant since 2006. The location is where a stop on the M-1 Rail streetcar line will be.

The Detroit location will feature an outdoor beer garden and live music. Read more here.

Queer Detroit underground: Carleton Gholz of DSC on forgotten innovators of techno

When club kids and other music peeps need to know which way is up or down in global dance culture they turn to Resident Advisor, which has editorial outposts in Berlin, London and Tokyo.

We found this recent piece on LGBT influence on the international scene on RA especially fine, with insights by Carleton Gholz of the Detroit Sound Conservancy on the origins of Detroit Techno particularly perceptive. Gholz is currently finishing up a post-doctoral teaching gig in Boston - not to mention finishing his book, Out Come the Freaks: Electronic Dance Music and the Making of Detroit after Motown - and moving back to Detroit where he belongs this spring. Dude, welcome back. 

No spoliers, just read the whole beautiful damn thing here.

IAYD plans year of helping young entrepreneurs succeed in business

I Am Young Detroit, the social venture that promotes entrepreneurship as a means to combat youth unemployment and boost economic impact in Detroit, turns 5 years old this month. 

To celebrate the organization will be hosting a live event Saturday, Jan. 25, at 7 p.m when it will launch its 2014 programs, which include: memberships, micro-grants and fellowships, pop lab, and startup services.

The event will take place at the Untitled Bottega in Detroit, and feature conversation, live performances by Cold English, food vendors, and its first pop lab pop-up: EMLE Clothing.

This year IAYD is doubling down on helping young entrepreneurs like EMLE launch companies in the seed stage. 

New programs include:

Membership
I Am Young Detroit members get access to exclusive resources and tools, discounts on products and events from partners, early access to beta apps and programs, discounts on premium services, and more. Three membership levels are available. Applications open Jan. 25.

Grants & fellowships
Five years in the making, I Am Young Detroit will be awarding monthly grants to Detroit entrepreneurs between the ages of 16 and 30, providing seed money to allow them the opportunity to begin turning their dreams into reality. Awards include micro-grants up to $1,000, mentor matching, "Doer" membership, opportunity for matching high school fellow, and access to co-working space. Applications open Jan. 25.

I Am Young Detroit's high school fellows are matched with select grantees based on their career goals and interests and receive a small monthly stipend, hands-on experience, and access to co-working space for the duration of their fellowship.

Pop Lab
In partnership with Dpop, I Am Young Detroit is providing a unique opportunity for Detroit-based entrepreneurs between the ages of 16 and 30 the opportunity to pop-in to vacant and underutilized spaces with their retail business ideas. They'll provide marketing, commercial design, media, place-matching, and logistics support. I Am Young Detroit will even match entrepreneurs with a mentor or two and help launch pop-ups in style with a fabulous event. Applications open Jan. 25.

Startup Services
I Am Young Detroit will be offering a curated selection of startup services to help launch local business. Services will include logo design, explainer video production, and retail design.
 
I Am Young America is a social venture that promotes entrepreneurship as a means to combat youth unemployment and boost economic impact in cities. Our mission is to help revitalize American cities by empowering young entrepreneurs to launch businesses, and mobilize citizens everywhere to champion them.

Get updates on I Am Young Detroit's Facebook page.

Discussion and screening of 'Girls Gone Vinyl' work in progress

An official selection of New York's Athena Film Festival-2013, the locally-produced documentary Girls Gone Vinyl will be getting a screening of the work in progress this Thursday at Cinema Detroit in Midtown's Cass Corridor.

There is also a panel discussion and VIP reception as part of Thursday's event, also a fundraiser to complete production of the film. 
 
The panel is made up of:
 
Jenny Lafemme- DJ and producer of Girls Gone Vinyl
Maggie Derthick- promoter and producer of Girls Gone Vinyl
Rebekah Farrugia - professor and author of Beyond The Dance Floor
Ted Krisko - DJ/producer currently playing across the Americas and Europe
Walter Wasacz - journalist and managing editor of Model D
 
VIP reception is 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. and is $75. That gets you cocktails and lite fare, a guaranteed seat for screening and the panel discussion, and a VIP gift bag.
 
General admittance is 7:30 p.m. and is $25 at the door. Screening is 8 p.m. Discussion and Q&A follows the screening. The night will feature the sounds by resident Girls Gone Vinyl DJs supported by the Audio Rescue Team.
 
Your ticket purchase directly funds the final needs to finish the film, editing and script writing.

The event is Thursday, Dec. 12 at Cinema Detroit, 3420 Cass Ave.

Urbanist Dispatch: Detroit music scene has potential to grow beyond current $1 billion

We thought this report from the Urbanist Dispatch would pair nicely with our Detroit music feature from last week.

An excerpt:

Despite its legacy, research by Florida and his colleagues at the University of Toronto’s Martin Prosperity Institute (MPI) suggests Detroit is not fully capitalizing on its local music scene. An analysis of figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis allowed MPI to develop a Metro Music Index to rank cities based on the local music scene.

Nashville tops the list, followed by the obvious (New York City and Los Angeles) and the surprising (Rochester, New York). Detroit doesn’t crack the top 25. It comes in at 37; unable to even beat much smaller Kalamazoo, Michigan, which is ranked eighth overall when small metros are included.

C'mon people, let's begin to rebuild and reload our funky groove thing. Read on here.

News: 'New Wave' brings energy to greater downtown

Oh, yes, we are definitely feeling the good urban vibes that are multiplying around the city, particularly in the greater downtown area visited by Michael H. Hodges for this piece. It's a good one. Here's an excerpt: 

That energy is visible in the commercial flowering in Corktown, where Two James Spirits and an expanded Motor City Wine recently joined more established businesses like Slows Bar BQ and the Mercury Burger Bar. You can see it in the 34 floors of spanking-new apartments -- every last one rented -- in the David Broderick Tower, once a dark, depressing sentinel that loomed over Grand Circus Park.

And you can hardly miss it in the annual Nain Rouge parade, or the formal pop-up dinner parties that briefly take over public spaces -- both animated by a new sense of fun and delight in the city.

Read more here.

Start making Noel Night plans now

The 41st Annual Noel Night is Saturday, Dec. 7 from 5 to 9:30 p.m. in Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center Area. Over 70 institutions, including the Detroit Institute of Arts, the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, the Detroit Historical Museum, the Detroit Public Library, and Model D HQ among many others, open their doors to the public free of charge during this Cultural Center-wide holiday "open house."

Activities include horse-drawn carriage rides, holiday shopping, family craft activities and performances by over 120 area music, theatre, and dance groups. The evening’s festivities culminate with a community sing-along on Woodward Avenue.

Noel Night activities take place in and around Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center institutions, primarily between Cass and John R and Kirby and Willis. Free shuttle service is offered between participating venues. Convenient parking is available in area lots. 

Noel Night is produced by the University Cultural Center Association, a nonprofit community development organization that supports economic growth in Detroit's Midtown district. Go here for more information.

'Detroit Unleaded' premieres Wednesday at DFT

Director Rola Nashef’s romantic dramedy Detroit Unleaded opens in Detroit at the Detroit Film Theatre at the Detroit Institute of Arts Nov. 13. Yes, that's tomorrow.

Detroit Unleaded premiered at the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival where it won the Grolsch Film Works Discovery Award. Expanding upon the award-winning 2007 short, Detroit Unleaded is a modern take on Romeo and Juliet that tells the story of Sami, a Lebanese-American who reluctantly takes over his father's gas station after he is murdered in an armed robbery. It's not a life that Sami ever wanted, nor did his late father who always encouraged his son to go to college. 

The gas station is more than just a pit stop for rolling papers and fake perfume, but a place where an infinite stream of spirited and often hilarious people flow through. When a gorgeous "up-do girl" named Najlah comes to deliver cheap long-distance phone cards, Sami quickly falls for her. Afraid her overprotective brother will disapprove, Najlah begins a romance with Sami under the promise of secrecy. As their love blossoms, Sami's dream of a better life begins to swell. We know you want to go, right?

Tickets for the film and the gala red carpet event are available here.

Planet Ant celebrates 20 years of creativity

Planet Ant Theatre celebrates its 20th anniversary with an evening of performances featuring current and former Planet Ant artists Friday, Oct. 11 at Detroit's Gem Theatre.

This event will celebrate the theatre's rich history of music, theatre and improv comedy. Hosted by Planet Ant Artistic Director Shawn Handlon, performances will include musical numbers taken from some of Planet Ant's best original productions, improv from the renowned Planet Ant Home Team and The 313, plus live band performances by 19.5 Collective, The Twilight Babies, and Pewter Club with Scott Sanford.

Tickets for Planet Ant's 20th Anniversary event are $30 balcony and $50 main floor and are available now here. Doors open at 7 p.m. with performances beginning at 8 p.m. A cash bar will be available, and a $10 discount is available for anyone who has been involved with a Planet Ant show or production. The Gem Theatre is at 333 Madison Ave, downtown Detroit.
 

105 Nightlife Articles | Page: | Show All
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