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Michigan Urban Farming Initiative seeks funds to build America's first sustainable "agrihood"

The Michigan Urban Farming Initiative (MUFI) is looking to strengthen its mission in Detroit's North End neighborhood with the transformation of an abandoned three-story apartment building into a community center. Should MUFI successfully raise $50,000 through a crowdfunding campaign, the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) will provide a $50,000 matching grant.

MUFI has been steadily working toward its goal of building "America's First Sustainable Urban Agrihood" since purchasing land in the North End in 2011. The planned community center, which would offer gathering space and nutritional and educational programming, would join a two-acre urban farm, 200-tree fruit orchard, children's sensory garden, water harvesting cistern, and more. A healthy food cafe and commercial kitchen is also planned.

A non-profit made up of volunteers, MUFI provides more than 300 varieties of produce to approximately 2,000 households, churches, and food pantries within a two-square mile radius of the farm. The produce is free.

The crowdfunding campaign and matching grant is part of MEDC's Public Spaces, Community Places placemaking initiative. MUFI has until Sunday, April 2 to meet or exceed the goal, which is being hosted on the Michigan-based Patronicity crowdfunding platform.

Auburn Hills-based automotive suppler BorgWarner kicked off the campaign with a $10,000 donation.

"The Public Spaces, Community Places placemaking grant is a creative way for supporters of the Michigan Urban Farming Initiative to have a hand in helping build America's first sustainable urban agrihood located in Detroit's lower North End community," Tyson Gersh, president and co-founder of MUFI, says in a statement. "Through the program, we can expand our agricultural campus with donations used to fund the restoration of a long-vacant building into the neighborhood's most sustainable Community Center along with a new healthy food café."

Click here to view the status of the crowdfunding campaign.

Michigan Urban Farming Initiative is located at 7432 Brush St. in Detroit.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Historic building preservation and restoration open house scheduled at Hug Factory in Eastern Market

"I always saw myself as a steward of these historic buildings. But I've found I'm at my best when helping others be stewards."

That's what Amy Swift told Model D in 2016 upon the opening of the Hug Factory, the headquarters for her Building Hugger renovation firm. The company specializes in historic window restoration and repair.

Swift continues her mission with the announcement of the second annual Building Hugger Community Mingle. She's partnered with three local historic preservation organizations for the event, which will offer guests a chance to learn about both restoration techniques as well as public policy issues affecting preservation today.

Brick + Beam Detroit, Preservation Detroit, and Michigan Historic Preservation Network will provide information on current preservation policy issues, including the state of the threatened federal historic tax credit. The organizations will then lead a postcard-writing session to advocate for the endangered tax credit.

Swift will lead a window restoration demonstration while opening up her shop to the public, allowing guests to visit employee work stations for first-hand interactions. Swift plans to open Hugs Hardware in the building, which will sell hard-to-find restoration supplies.

Michigan Women's Foundation and the Build Institute will also be on hand to provide information on their programming for entrepreneurs.

"Informing our community about the preservation policies and best practices that affect property owners in Detroit every day is core to our mission at Building Hugger," says Swift. "We're excited to be able to bring in our partners for a shared advocacy day while also celebrating our achievements and giving thanks to our supporters for helping us through such a big year. It'll be a fun afternoon."

The Building Hugger Community Mingle is free and open to the public. RSVPs are not required but are encouraged, which can be done here. The event is Saturday, Feb. 25 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Building Hugger is located in Eastern Market at 3036 Chene St.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Days before an RFP deadline, Gilbert makes one last play for downtown site of stalled county jail

Dan Gilbert's Rock Ventures is still attempting to acquire the current Wayne County jail site, this despite County Executive Warren Evans promising to issue an RFP to finish construction of the long-stalled jail this Friday, Feb. 10.

Gilbert and fellow billionaire businessman Tom Gores recently submitted a request for a Major League Soccer franchise in Detroit and want to build the stadium at the current site of construction, which was halted in 2013 due to estimated cost overruns in the tens of millions of dollars. The site is located at the intersection of I-375 and Gratiot Avenue on the eastern edge of downtown.

Announced late Monday, Feb. 6, Rock Ventures has submitted an offer to Wayne County where it will build the county a brand new criminal justice complex at a different location for $300 millionthe current estimated cost of completing the stalled jail site. Rock Ventures would then build a $1 billion mixed-use development on the downtown site, including a soccer stadium and office, commercial, residential, and hotel space.

The criminal justice complex proposed by Rock Ventures would cost an estimated $420 million to complete, though the company would charge the county $300 million for construction. Adult and juvenile detention facilities would be located on the campus, including a new criminal courthouse that would replace the Frank Murphy Hall of Justice downtown.

The Rock Ventures-proposed criminal justice complex would be located one and a half miles north of downtown, at I-75 and E. Forest Avenue.

"We have worked hard to develop and deliver to the County a proposal that, we believe, will be the best long-term outcome for the County and for the future of downtown Detroit," says Matt Cullen, principal of Rock Ventures. "Specifically, we will deliver to the County a modern, consolidated criminal justice center with no risk and at the same dollar amount they estimate it would cost them to complete the project on Gratiot.

"In addition, we are prepared to build a development on the Gratiot Avenue Site, located in the heart of the sports and entertainment district, that will provide significant economic impact and that Detroiters will be proud to have at the 'front door' to the city."

No word yet from Wayne County, as of publication.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Historic apartment buildings receive $24M investment, re-open as affordable housing complex

In November 2013, Detroit Police called the Colony and Fisher Arms Apartments the most problematic addresses in the city. It was then when a combined force of 150 officers from different law enforcement agencies raided the east side apartment complex, arresting 33 people.

Just over three years later and the historic apartment complex is in the news for completely different reasons. On the morning of Jan. 28, 2017, more than one hundred people, including Mayor Mike Duggan, Detroit Police Department Chief James Craig, and Detroit City Council President Brenda Jones, gathered to celebrate the rehabilitation and re-opening of the 161-unit affordable housing apartment complex.

A combination of financing pieced together by Cinnaire and Chesapeake Community Advisors made the project possible, having secured $24 million dollars in financing. That multi-tiered financing included Federal Historic Tax Credits, Federal Low Income Housing Tax Credits, an FHA loan, a renewal of Section 8 rental subsidy, and Federal Home Loan Bank of Indianapolis Affordable Housing Program Funds. The city of Detroit contributed vacant city-owned property for secure parking for the residents.

"It is a completely different place," says Mayor Mike Duggan. "This is the quality we're going to continue to build for the people of the City of Detroit."

To reflect the new and improved apartments, the historic Colony and Fisher Arms Apartments have undergone a name change and have since been re-branded as the River Crest Apartments.

Cinnaire, a non-profit community development group, has contributed $500 million in investment in Detroit over the last 23 years. Cinnaire, Chesapeake Community Advisors, and Building Blocks received Spirit of Detroit awards from City Council President Brenda Jones.

River Crest Apartments is located at 9333 and 9303 E. Jefferson Ave. in Detroit.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Mini-grants awarded to community groups seeking to transform vacant lots throughout city

Ten community-led projects have been selected by the Detroit Future City Implementation Office as mini-grant recipients. Each group received a $6,500 grant to jump-start their plans for vacant land revitalization projects.

In October 2015, the DFC Implementation Office released "Working with Lots: A Field Guide." The book featured 34 different design suggestions for vacant land use in the city. Rain gardens, native butterfly meadows, and natural ground pollution remediation techniques are just some of the projects found in the 74-page guide.

The Field Guide is available online and print editions can be found at the DFC Implementation Office in New Center.

Ten projects were selected from the more than 30 applicants entered for the mini-grant competition. While it's up to the community groups how to build and spend on their projects, the DFC Implementation Office does stipulate that from the $6,500 awarded, only a maximum of $5,000 can be spent on project implementation and that at least $1,500 must be reserved for maintenance, programming, and education.

The winning groups are GenesisHOPE Community Development Corporation, Mack Avenue Community Church Community Development Corporation, Manistique Block Club 200-300 Block, Southwest Detroit Business Association, Minock Park Block Association, O'Hair Park Community Association, Popps Packing, Wyoming-Kentucky-Indiana-Wisconsin-Ohio Block Club, Motor City Grounds Crew, and Mecca Development Corporation.

"The Southwest Detroit Business Association is going to use the DFC grant to transform a currently vacant lot into an eco-friendly parking lot," says Greg Mangan, Real Estate Advocate at Southwest Detroit Business Association.

Being eco-friendly is definitely a theme. O'Hair Park Community Association, for example, is building the 8 Mile Rain Garden. "The 8 Mile Rain Garden lot design will help to manage stormwater runoff and will be a model for community members to duplicate as we begin to restore nearly 100 vacant side lots with purpose and beauty," says Joyce Daniel, O'Hair Park Community Association Treasurer.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Detroit to receive grant money and Innovation Team from Bloomberg Philanthropies

Detroit has been named a member of the Bloomberg Philanthropies Innovation Team program, making the city eligible for up to three years of $500,000 grants. The money is to be used to fund an in-house Innovation Team, which will focus on improving city life through the development of new and novel solutions to issues faced by city residents.

The organization says that the Innovation Team will take a measurable approach, one with clear plans and goals. By funding an in-house group that could stay for as long as three years, the team will be better able to understand the complexities local to Detroit. Bloomberg Philanthropies will also provide implementation support and facilitate an exchange of ideas between the different Innovation Team sites.

Detroit was selected from a pool of cities from all over the world and joins a group that includes Be'er Sheva, Israel; Toronto, Canada; Anchorage, Alaska; Austin, Texas; Baltimore, Maryland; and Durham, North Carolina. Eligible cities must have at least 100,000 residents and a mayor with at least two years left in office.

"I am happy to welcome the Bloomberg Innovation Team into our city to help create new ideas to better the lives of Detroiters across our city," said Mayor Mike Duggan.

Bloomberg Philanthropies is billionaire businessman and former mayor of New York City Michael Bloomberg's umbrella organization for his charitable activities, which includes personal gifts and his foundation. The organization has five focus areas: Public health, environment, education, government innovation, and the arts.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Museum honoring nation's first African American-owned TV station to open on MLK Day

In 1975, the nation's first African American-owned and -operated television station opened on East Jefferson Avenue in Detroit. This Martin Luther King, Jr. day on Monday, January 16, the doors of the old WGPR-TV 62 studios will re-open as the William V. Banks Broadcast Museum & Media Center, honoring the station's historic legacy as well as its founder, Dr. William V. Banks.

WGPR-TV 62 was a station of many firsts. In addition to being the first African American-owned and -operated television station in the United States, the station was the first Detroit station to stay on air 24 hours a day, broadcast programming in Arabic, and use Electronic News Gathering equipment.

The station stayed on air from 1975 to 1995, until it was purchased by CBS.

Museum attractions will include interactive video exhibits, memorabilia displays, and archival program footage. Displays of former TV and radio personalities and employees of both WGPR and the city at large will also be present. Additionally, the topic of Black media ownership in general will be explored.

A second phase of development will build a media training center for middle school and high school students.

"We are extremely excited to see this long-awaited project come to fruition," says Joe Spencer, former WGPR program director and current president of the WGPR-TV Historical Society. "WGPR-TV was a trailblazer in many ways, and visitors to the museum will see the amazing ways the station paved the way for minority programming and updated technology, as well as launched the careers of many successful African Americans in the media."

Spencer left the television business following the CBS buyout, turning his focus to his Louisiana Creole Gumbo line of restaurants, as detailed in a recent Model D profile here.

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan and Detroit Historical Society executive director and CEO Robert Bury will be on hand for the grand opening on Monday, January 16, at 9:30 a.m. The museum will remain open to the public following the ceremony.

The William V. Banks Broadcast Museum & Media Center is located at 3146 E. Jefferson Ave. Regular museum hours of operation are every Friday from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Restoration of the Treymore Apartments building results in 28 affordable housing units in Midtown

Detroiters feeling the pinch of rising rental rates in the city's greater downtown have reason to turn their attention to Brainard Street. There, in the bustling development hotspot between Wayne State University and Little Caesars Arena is the Treymore, will be an affordable housing redevelopment that offers 28 one- and two-bedroom units to Detroiters earning 50 to 60 percent of the area's average median income.

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan cut the ribbon on the redveloped apartment building this past Friday, Dec. 9.

"These are the kinds of projects the City of Detroit is happy to support because they are example of how Detroit comes back, there is room and opportunity for everyone," says Mayor Duggan. The city contributed $3.5 million in HOME program funds.

A number of other organizations contributed to the redevelopment, creating a patchwork of financing. The Michigan State Housing Development Authority (MSHDA) contributed $3 million in affordable housing tax credits. Cinnaire financed and syndicated the MSHDA credits. And the building's developer, Paradise Valley Investment Group (PVI), contributed hundreds of thousands in private equity and brownfield tax credits.

In all, it cost $7 million to renovate the building, which has sat vacant for over two decades. The condition of the building forced developers to completely strip it of infrastructure and start fresh, requiring the installation of new windows, energy efficient HVAC, and lighting. Also new is the roof, landscaping, and greenspace.

The Treymore is a four story, 30,000 sq. ft. building erected in the early 1900s. Two-thirds of the 28 units are already leased.

"Restoring this building has been life changing," says PVI president and CEO, Robin Scovill. "Its condition when we started, juxtaposed with the finished product, is shocking."

The Treymore is located at 457 Brainard St.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Art and coffee collide in Hamtramck with the opening of Oloman Cafe

A new cafe and gallery has opened in Hamtramck. And for owner Zlatan Sadikovic, it's an opportunity to combine many of his loves.

Oloman Cafe opened to steady crowds on the morning of Monday, December 5th. The cafe, which is part coffee shop, part art gallery, and part photography studio, is located in the former space of the Belmont Bar.

The Belmont spent most of its life as a music venue, though in its latter couple of years new ownership had turned it into a sports bar. Vacant for several years, Sadikovic obtained the venue and began working on it in 2014. Originally planning on using the space for a photography studio, the infrastructure of the building sparked Sadikovic's coffee shop idea. So he combined the two visions, spending the last few years working on an exhaustive overhaul of the building.

Sadikovic and his son Igor, who manages the business, did much of the work themselves, tearing up a floor left rotted by a badly leaking roof and coming up with their own interior designs. The old bar remains, though sharply redesigned, and a small portrait studio occupies the space of the old stage. Out on the back patio, which Sadikovic is outfitting with plants and flowers, is the old Belmont sign, something Sadikovic plans on displaying.

"I kept the sign," says Sadikovic. "People have an emotional attachment to old places."

Sadikovic is one of those people. A native Bosnian, Sadikovic and his wife left for the United States after the war of the 1990s ravaged their country. They've named the Oloman Cafe after one of their favorite cafes in downtown Sarajevo, a place where the city's artists would gather and drink espresso on the sidewalk patio. Zlatan and his wife Indira met at that cafe, which would come to be damaged and demolished over the course of the war.

"That place disappeared. We decided to create something on the other side of the world with the same feel," says Sadikovic. "It's maybe a sentimental type of thing but it is what it is. We come back to things from our past."

The Oloman Cafe has a good chance at becoming a spot where artists congregate. In addition to the coffee and food, which is purchased from local makers Golden Wheat and Guerilla Food, Oloman will have once-a-month art openings in the gallery.

Sadikovic also purchased the building next door, which he has turned into Lint Silver and Sawdust, a rentable co-working space for artists.

Oloman Cafe is located at 10215 Joseph Campau Ave. in Hamtramck.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

New bike shop celebrates opening in downtown Hamtramck

It may have taken longer than initially expected, but the Wheelhouse Detroit bicycle shop has officially opened for business in downtown Hamtramck. The Hamtramck location complements owner Kelli Kavanaugh's original Wheelhouse Detroit, which opened on the Detroit RiverWalk in 2008.

Since we first reported on the Hamtramck location this past March, Kavanaugh has been working on getting the storefront ready for business. Permits have been approved, inspections have been passed, and numerous construction projects have been completed, including a new roof, lighting, and HVAC and electrical systems.

While it may not be prime bike-buying season, Kavanaugh wanted to open the store on Black Friday and in time for the holiday shopping rush.

"I feel relieved," Kavanaugh says of the store's opening. "It's a mixture of excitement and anxiety. It's a fruition of a dream several years in the making but there's that anxiety of spending the money on the new shop. But the exciting things in life are always a combination of those two feelings."

In stocking the store with bicycles, accessories, and active wear, Kavanaugh has placed an emphasis on selecting products that were made in the United States. Those products include bicycles from the Detroit-based Detroit Bikes, locks from Kabletek, and bags from Green Guru, Alchemy, Chrome Industries, Ironweed and Timbuk2.

Kavanaugh has also teamed up with Hamtramck-based apparel maker William + Bonnie, creating a new line of cycling clothing for professionals cycling to work. The line of apparel is available exclusively at the Wheelhouse shop.

[Check out this Model D article on the unique aesthetic of the garment shop William + Bonnie]

Other Wheelhouse features include a service department, rentals, and guided tours.

The shop's winter hours are Sunday, noon to 5 p.m., Monday, noon to 6 p.m., Thursday, noon to 6 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

The new Wheelhouse Detroit is located at 9401 Joseph Campau St. in Hamtramck.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

November development news round-up: New homes in North Corktown, a new home for basketball, and more

Let's catch up on some of the biggest stories from the past five weeks.

While it's Corktown that receives the lion's share of development attention, its neighbor across the freeway, North Corktown, has been in the news lately, too. Construction of traditionally-financed single-family homes will begin in Spring 2017 on Ash and Sycamore streets, featuring contemporary designs by Christian Hurttienne Architects. Meanwhile, an affordable housing development that stretches across 54 acres was reported by the Detroit News and includes "elite" New York architect Alexander Gorlin and possibly Grammy-winning musician Pharrell Williams. There is, however, no official word on any timeline.

The Detroit Pistons are moving back to their namesake city, 38 years after leaving the cozy confines of Cobo Arena for the Pontiac Silverdome in 1978. The basketball organization announced this month that they will be joining the Detroit Red Wings hockey team in occupying Little Caesars Arena, which is currently under construction just north of downtown. Both teams will open their 2017-18 seasons in the new arena. Rumored sites for a Pistons practice facility include a West Grand Boulevard location in New Center. The Pistons are leaving The Palace of Auburn Hills, built by former owner William Davidson in 1988.

In historic preservation news, the CPA Building across from Michigan Central Station has been saved from demolitionat least for now. It was reported earlier this month that the building's owners, the New York City-based BFD Corktown LLC, were granted a demolition permit for the building. But as news broke, preservation and neighborhood advocates quickly mobilized, gathering over 1,000 signatures to petition its destruction. Detroit City Council took note and granted the building, which opened in 1923, an interim historic building designation, delaying demolition for up to one year and opening it up to further studies.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Using the literary arts to fight blight on Tuxedo Street

A sentimental drive by a childhood home is a common occurrence in the city, country, and everywhere betweeneven for Pulitzer Prize winners. Stephen Henderson, the Pulitzer Prize-winning Detroit Free Press columnist and host of both radio and television talk shows, has been checking in on his own childhood home since moving back to Detroit in 2007.

He says his family's former home on Tuxedo Street on the city's west side was well-kept back in 2007 but, as the years wore on, Henderson watched the house deteriorate. In 2012, a window was boarded up. Soon, all the windows would be boarded up. Eventually, the house was stripped.

Henderson is now leading a charge to transform the vacant house on Tuxedo Street from an eyesore into an asset. A purchase agreement to buy the house from the Detroit Land Bank is nearly complete.

Dubbed the Tuxedo Project, the house at 7124 Tuxedo St. will become a literary and community center, complete with an English professor-in-residence. The house will be rehabilitated and turned into a space for students and community members to share their stories and create new ones, using the literary arts to effect positive change. Plans for other abandoned homes on the 7100 block of Tuxedo Street will follow.

"It's the idea of the power of one," says Henderson. "What happens if one person returns to where they're from and tries to make changes, what will that inspire, and will there be a ripple effect of change."

Henderson has a big team behind him. The Knight Foundation and Marygrove College are working together to bring an English professor to Tuxedo Street. Members of Henderson's 1988 graduating class of University of Detroit Jesuit High School have rallied together to form a non-profit. And the Michigan Economic Development Corporation and Michigan State Housing Development Authority have included the Tuxedo Project in its Public Spaces Community Places initiative.

Should the Tuxedo Project successfully raise $50,000 by November 28, MEDC and MSHDA will contribute a $50,000 matching grant. The crowdfunding campaign is being held on the Michigan-based Patronicity platform.

"None of this is any more than an idea in my head without these partnerships," says Henderson.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

It's a match! MCM winners use grant money to help cushion construction costs

Construction is starting this week on the Meta Physica Wellness Center in Corktown. The business will be located in the Bagley and Trumbull building, which counts the Bearded Lady salon and barber shop, Mama Coo's Boutique, and the Farmer's Hand market as its tenants. The latter two businesses are Motor City Match winners. All four businesses in the Bagley and Trumbull building will be women-owned.

Meta Physica Wellness Center owner Jenevieve Biernat started her massage business in Midtown, which she has since outgrown. The Corktown studio will feature expanded services, including two massage rooms, three saunas, a raw juice bar, and an apothecary. Biernat won both a $50,000 Hatch award and a $20,000 Motor City Match grant for her business earlier this year.

"Every bit of money helps," says Biernat. "You don't always know how much you need going in but it turns out you need a lot of money to do this."

Biernat says that once she's established, she'd like to put herself in a position to help others through the Motor City Match application process.

A resident of Corktown, Biernat has been visiting the other shops at Bagley and Trumbull nearly every day, learning from her future neighbors, and soaking up as much advice and information that she can.

Another $20,000 Motor City Match grant winner, Noelle Lothamer, is currently in the midst of construction of an Eastern Market storefront for her Beau Bien Fine Foods. The Michigan-sourced fruit jam-, chutney-, and mustard-makers recently celebrated the one year anniversary of their Eastern Market location, which has served primarily as a kitchen.

Lothamer says the money won from Motor City Match has quickly gone toward construction costs, including the storefront, roof, and some other much needed repairs. "As soon as we knew we could spend it, we did."

The hope is for the storefront to open by Thanksgiving, though Lothamer cautions that there is no set date. In addition to acting as a retail area for their jams, chutneys, and mustards, the Beau Bien Fine Foods storefront will also offer grab-and-go sandwiches, salads, and drinks.

Meta Physica Wellness Center is located at 1707 Trumbull Ave.

Beau Bien Fine Foods is located at 2478 Riopelle St.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Third round of grant program seeks to give $2M to Detroit non-profits

Major foundations has been very generous to Detroit nonprofits in recent years. Once again, these groups are being encouraged to apply for up to $150,000 in grant money.

The Kresge Foundation is giving away a total of $2 million in the third round of its Kresge Innovative Projects: Detroit program. $3 million has already been granted through the first two rounds of the program, which launched in 2014.

The Kresge Foundation expects to award the grants to 15 to 20 groups across the city, including at least one in each of Detroit's seven city council districts. The money is reserved for implementation grants and each project has 18 months to reach completion. Nonprofit organizations have until Nov. 21 to submit their applications, which can be done online.

The grants will be awarded to those projects that focus on vacant land use issues, public and open space, and neighborhood stabilization programs. Previous grant-winners include exercise pocket parks in central Detroit, a neighborhood clean-up and stabilization program in the Osborn neighborhood, and a green parking lot and community space in Grandmont Rosedale.

"This initiative has been successful because of the knowledge, know-how and dedication of residents and leaders across Detroit's neighborhoods," George C. Jacobsen, senior program officer of The Kresge Foundation's Detroit Program, says in a statement. "We continue to learn from the grantees we've funded over the first two rounds about what it takes to make a tangible difference in city neighborhoods as well as how we might continue to support their ability to catalyze further efforts in building stronger neighborhoods."

Two informative sessions will be held for those interested in applying for the grant. The first will be held at Jam Handy on Oct. 25 from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. and the second will be held at TechTown on Nov. 15 from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Grooming company to return to Detroit, open barbershop in Corktown

Detroit Grooming Company is returning to its namesake city. The company, which outgrew a small production space on Fort Street in Detroit, had since established itself in Ferndale, with both a larger production facility and, most recently, a Woodward Avenue barbershop.

At a private event for friends and family, the team behind Detroit Grooming Company announced that they would be opening a second barbershop, this one on Michigan Avenue in Detroit's Corktown neighborhood. The owners hope for a late 2016 or early 2017 opening in 2000 Michigan Ave., a building currently undergoing extensive renovations.

Detroit Grooming Company co-owner and CEO Michael Haddad says that a return to Detroit is important for the company. While it's a great business opportunity to open a new barbershop in development-crazed Corktown, Haddad says that it's also important to re-establish a presence in the city for which it takes its name.

Haddad started the company in 2013, developing his own blend of beard oil. When Detroit Grooming Company launched, it had four products; today, Detroit Grooming Company has over 200 personal care and beauty products. Though the company started in the beard oil business, it has since expanded to products for both men and women, from mustache wax to hand soap, hair pomade to combs and brushes.

At a recent party at the Detroit Grooming Company Barber Shop, the owners threw quite the event to celebrate the big announcement. A red carpet and photographer greeted the guests. Chef Brennan Calnin, formerly of Detroit's Townhouse restaurant, offered a menu that included smoked turkey neck tamales and laughing bird shrimp ceviche. Corktown's Batch Brewery was on hand, supplying an exclusive firkin of Goodrich, a wet-hopped version of their Marzen. And perhaps most befitting for a company that got its start in the beard oil business, old-timey band Shine on Kentucky Moon provided the music.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.
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