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New art and design gallery to open on Woodward Avenue

They're stacking art galleries on top of each other in Midtown these days. The Corridor Gallery is preparing to open its doors for its first exhibition, right above the Woodward Gallery. Each are part of Lawrence Technological University's Detroit Center for Design + Technology (DCDT) on Woodward Avenue.

The "Datum: Detroit" exhibition opens in the new second-floor Corridor Gallery on Thursday, Feb. 8, with the gallery reception scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 15. The exhibition documents and examines the work of Detroit-based furniture designers. Produced by NEXT:SPACE, the exhibition has the stated intent of defining the next generation of local furniture designers, while also reinforcing Detroit's role as an international center of design. Heather Saunders is the photographer.

Datum: Detroit runs through April 25.

"The creation of the Corridor Gallery is an effort to expand our ability to host local artists and designers at the DCDT, further exposing the public, LTU students and our partner organizations to the innovative work being done right here in Detroit," Christopher Stefani, associate director of Detroit Center for Design + Technology, said in a statement.

"This gallery will take on smaller, salon-style shows that look to curate an intellectual conversation around local design professions and their corresponding economy. It is also meant to showcase the work of our own economy initiatives."

The DCDT's exhibition season kicked off earlier this year with the opening of "Intersections: The City Through Cartography," in the first-floor Woodward Gallery. The exhibition features contemporary maps made by Detroiters and runs through March 30.

In addition to its art and design galleries, the DCDT is the home of LTU's College of Architecture and Design's Detroit programs, a co-working space, business incubator, and more. It opened in 2016.

Woodward Gallery and Corridor Gallery are located on the first and second floors, respectively, of the Detroit Center for Design + Technology at 4219 Woodward Ave. in Detroit.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Paralee Boyd Salon opens flagship location in Midtown, plans nationwide expansion

Paralee Boyd, which specializes in providing haircare for women of color with thick and curly hair, sets itself apart from seemingly similar salons by eschewing the traditional appointment-based model and instead only offering its services on a walk-in basis.

And now the unique salon is opening in Detroit, in a high-profile location in Midtown on Woodward Avenue. It's the second location for the salon, and its first in Detroit. Paralee Boyd Salon first opened in Southfield in 2012.

Though newer, Dana White, the owner of Paralee Boyd, considers the Midtown location her flagship studio, and the point from which she'll launch her brand on a national level. White has big plans for Paralee Boyd, and she's prepared herself with a novel approach to haircare and a well-manicured attention to detail.

White says that while living in New York, she found salons that worked on a walk-ins-only approach, something different than what she was used to while growing up in Michigan. And they were cheaper, too. What appointments-based salons offered, however, was more business stability. So White sought to combine the best of both styles.

Before opening her salon in Southfield, White consulted with engineers from members of the Big 3 auto companies. She wanted to take the walk-ins-only process and streamline it, make it more efficient and stable.

White embraced the principles of lean manufacturing, eliminating waste while improving productivity, and it worked. In busy times, White says her Southfield salon services 600 to 700 women a month. She's planning on opening five to ten more salons in the metro Detroit area, and then more throughout the state. She's also exploring opportunities in 200 major markets nationwide.

"I specifically chose metro Detroit to launch my brand because I know what I'm doing is innovative and I wanted to come to the center of innovation," says White. "It's not lost on me that my lean manufacturing practices are the same as those of Henry Ford."

Paralee Boyd Salon opens Thursday, Dec. 21, at 7 a.m. Its hours of operation are Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Paralee Boyd Salon is located at 3939 Woodward Ave. in Detroit.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Natural fragrance-maker opens flagship retail shop and cocktail bar in Midtown

A Gothic-Victorian mansion built in the 1880s has been steadily accumulating tenants since full-scale restoration work first started in 2014. Once a hollowed-out shell of its former self, the Midtown building, located at the intersection of Second Avenue and Alexandrine Street, is currently home to three residential units and the Detroit Clothing Circle clothing store. It once hosted the 2016 beer garden, Stadt Garten.

Located in a newly restored garden unit of the building, Sfumato Fragrances, the creator and purveyor of natural fragrances and scent experiences, celebrated the opening of its flagship retail location this past Black Friday. In addition to retail, the Sfumato space will also host Castalia, a craft cocktail bar.

"The garden level below the traffic and city noise is a perfect sanctuary for the senses," says community developer and Sfumato's new landlord, Mark R. Beard. "Sfumato fills that void better than anyone else in Detroit."

The Sfumato line features only natural ingredients extracted from plants, and supplies lists of all ingredients used. For example, Epiphany features Chamomile, Cypress, Frankincense, Galbanum, Grapefruit, Katrafay, Lavender, Petitgrain, Rosemary, Sweet Orange, Vetiver, and Ylang Ylang.

In addition to their signature line of fragrances, Sfumato creates custom fragrances for order, be it for people, businesses, or weddings and other events.

"Not to knock the DDSs in my family, but Sfumato is way less scary than the dental office that was in the same space a century ago," says Beard.

Castalia, the craft cocktail bar, won't operate regular bar hours, but rather ticketed events that pair fragrances with signature cocktails. Such sensory experiences have been a big part of Sfumato since its founding by Kevin Peterson and Jane Larson in 2013, including custom events at a number of bars, restaurants, and other businesses throughout the region.

Sfumato Fragrances is open from noon to 7 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Expanded hours will occur as the new year begins.

Sfumato Fragrances is located at 3980 Second Ave. in Detroit.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Detroit's Whitney to receive nearly $1M worth of energy efficiency upgrades

Wayne County has scored its first PACE project and it's a notable one: The landmark Whitney mansion and restaurant on Woodward Avenue. The 123 year old building is set to receive $863,130 worth of energy efficiency upgrades thanks to financing from Petros PACE Finance of Austin, Texas.

PACE, or Property Assessed Clean Energy, is a national program that helps businesses finance energy efficiency and renewable energy projects that save money in the long run but require expensive investment up front.

It allows property owners this ability through a special property tax assessment with local governments. The tax assessment then frees up lenders' ability to provide up to 20-year, low rate, fixed-interest loans.

"It's a great story to have a building with such an incredibly rich history in the PACE program," says Andy Levin, president of Lean & Green Michigan and managing partner of Levin Energy Partners.

"The fixtures in the Whitney mansion were literally installed by Thomas Edison and now, at 123 years old, it's going to become a model building of our low-carbon future."

Of the improvements planned are storm windows designed for each of the building's 200-plus windows, LED lighting throughout the building, including the chandeliers, energy efficient HVAC equipment, energy efficient kitchen equipment, and a building controls system that is operated via smartphone—virtually from anywhere in the world.

According to a Lean & Green Michigan Case Study, the energy efficiency upgrades will provide Whitney owner Bud Liebler an savings of $23,528 annually.

Construction is set to begin this month and could be finished by the end of 2017.

This is the first PACE project for Wayne County, joining Oakland and Macomb in the region and many more throughout the state that have taken advantage of the program.

The Whitney is located at 4421 Woodward Ave. in Detroit.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Art, design, and urbanism combine for 'groundbreaking' MFA program in Midtown

A confluence of art, design, and urbanism is coming to Detroit thanks to a new master's degree program at Lawrence Technological University's Detroit Center for Technology + Design in Midtown. Officials are touting the Master of Fine Arts program as groundbreaking and a first for the region.

The Social Practice master's degree looks at how art and design can positively impact public space in our communities, says Steve Coy, the Lawrence Tech assistant professor who developed the program.

Coy estimates there are only eleven such programs in the United States, with the first known Social Practice program developed at the California College of the Arts in 2005. Most other Social Practice programs are located on the east and west coasts of the country, with the nearest known program being offered at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh.

While Coy says that people have been using art, design, and urbanism to affect positive change in Detroit for years, a more formal and institutional approach can further enhance such efforts.

"This will allow us to connect people so that conversations and movements can unify, to give us a point to rally around," says Coy. "Universities are open source networks. We can share what works, what doesn't work, and make it better so people aren't acting in isolated pockets."

The program will cover a broad spectrum of ideas, from city planning and tactical urbanism to street art and public persuasion. It's a win-win, says Coy, as communities get well-thought out solutions to planning issues while students get on-the-ground training for future professions.

He adds that the program should appeal to those interested in planning, design, and the arts.

Coy first started teaching at Lawrence Tech in 2011, though he's probably best known for the Hygienic Dress League, the public art project he co-founded with his wife Dorota. The Coys also co-founded Wolf Moon Mixers.

Enrollment for the Social Practice MFA program is now open. More information is available online.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

New Matrix Head Start Center at Spirit of Hope offers children unique learning opportunities

A partnership between Matrix Human Services and Spirit of Hope Church has resulted in the opening of a new Head Start Center, providing children ages 3 to 5 years old with free preschool education while also helping to restore and preserve parts of a historic Detroit church.

The Matrix Head Start Center opened in the building this past March. Matrix and Spirit of Hope partnered to bring the Head Start Center up to code, providing much needed investment in and upgrades for the old church.

According to Nolana Nobles Bandy, assistant director for Matrix Head Start, the new Head Start location is "right where it needed to be," and that the Spirit of Hope location provides children with a more natural learning environment. Spirit of Hope's community garden and animals, which includes a pig and a number of chickens, will be used to teach children and their families about healthy eating habits.

Nobles Bandy also believes that the historic nature of the building—its sanctuary was built in 1892 and its annex was built in 1926—is a much better setting for learning when compared to a modern "cookie cutter" building that feels more like an office than a school. She speaks of lighting that has a beautiful glow and the echo of the children's steps, bouncing off the old architecture. "It's something different that sparks curiosity," she says.

Nobles Bandy, who has a Ph.D. in International Psychology and System Design, sees the church as a more comfortable setting for adults, too.

"People act differently when in a church compared to a clinic. It's a natural setting for expressing oneself," she says. "It's like a tree in the yard providing shade. People approach it on their own time when they need it."

The Head Start Center is currently recruiting children for classes, which is free and available to children from any zip code. Enrollment and more information can be found at www.matrixheadstart.org.

Spirit of Hope Church is located 1519 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Rock and roll pie shop re-opens in Detroit with own space

Dangerously Delicious Pies is once again serving their sweet and savory pies in the city of Detroit. The rock and roll pie shop had a soft opening in the newly redeveloped Strathmore Apartments building this past Saturday, March 4. It will remain open with regular hours, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., seven days a week.

It's been over six months since the pie shop was open in Detroit. They first served their pies out of the now-demolished Comet Bar. Dangerously Delicious Pies then operated out of the kitchen of Third Street Bar for several years before closing up shop there in the summer of 2016.

In the months leading up to the end of that relationship, Midtown Detroit, Inc. reached out to the pie shop and offered to help Dangerously Delicious Pies find a space of their own. The neighborhood group didn't want to see the pie shop leave the area and ended up financing part of the build-out of the new space.

Don Duprie, co-owner of Dangerously Delicious Pies and also a River Rouge fireman and accomplished songwriter and musician, says the company is thankful for the help. The new storefront has an old school vibe that includes subway tiles and a checkerboard floor. He hopes the new pie shop will be a place that's comfortable for everyone.

"I think it's great," says Duprie. "It's between the Magic Stick and the Old Miami. It's near Woodward. There's a lot of history down there."

In addition to pies, Duprie and his team are planning on hosting live music once a week. A small one- or two-person stage has been constructed. A planned grand opening party, perhaps in partnership with new neighbors Pure Detroit, should occur in early April and feature live performances from Duprie and friends.

Last year, Dangerously Delicious Pies opened a bakery in River Rouge and storefront in Wyandotte, which will remain open.

Dangerously Delicious Pies is located at 70 W. Alexandrine St. in Detroit.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Two new co-working spaces and business incubators to debut in the city

One of the biggest trends in development lately has been the co-working space. A number of them have opened in the past few years and some, like downtown's Bamboo, have experienced significant upgrades. Here are two more co-working spaces making the news today.

In Midtown, Lawrence Technological University's Detroit Center for Design + Technology (DCDT) recently debuted a co-working space with creative professionals in mind called DCDT Cowork. They'll soon complement DCDT Cowork with an in-house design studio, DCDT fellowship program, and the DCDT Design Accelerator program. As a whole, it's called Design Incubator and launches in February.

DCDT is accepting applications to the Design Accelerator program until Feb. 10. The 10-week course for aspiring entrepreneurs begins Feb. 15 and ends with a Pop-Up Showcase where two winners will be selected for $2,500 seed grants.

"This 10-week program packs it all in, from legal considerations to branding and more," says Karen Evans, director of the DCDT Design Incubator. "The Design Accelerator is completely hands-on, giving you the expertise and space for improving on each component of your business from week to week, with guidance from experienced facilitators."

Lawrence Technological University's Detroit Center for Design + Technology is located at 4219 Woodward Ave. in Detroit.

Opening downtown is SpaceLab Detroit, a new co-working space geared more toward building industry professionals. SpaceLab is scheduled to open on the seventh floor of 607 Shelby St. this March. Renovations are currently underway at the 5,200 sq. ft. space.

With a design library, conference rooms, project display areas, a community kitchen, large-format plotters, and education and networking events, president and managing partner Karen Burton is designing SpaceLab to appeal to a range of building industry professionals, from architects to community development organizations, real estate agents to interior designers.

Burton is a marketing consultant to architects and engineers and has previously served as an architectural designer.

"As an entrepreneur, I know what it's like to work from home without all the amenities of a typical large office, including being able to turn to a co-worker to share an idea," says Burton. "I understand the need for solopreneurs and small businesses to be able to collaborate and share resources."

SpaceLab Detroit is a Round 4 Motor City Match Space Awardee.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Bakery and cafe to open in Midtown this spring

Cake Ambition is coming to Third Street.

In the seven years since starting her business, Cake Ambition owner Jessica Bouren has baked and crafted her specialty cakes out of a number of shared locations, from family kitchens to Traffic Jam & Snug, where she currently rents kitchen facilities. But this March, Bouren will finally have a place to call her own.

Cake Ambition will open a storefront at 4154 Third St. this March. The shop will operate as a bakery and cafe, allowing Bouren to bake in the back while customers enjoy cake and coffee at the cafe tables up front. There will also be a retail area where Bouren will carry products from local makers: coffees, teas, jams, and nuts will be complemented by a wall of old-fashioned candy.

The main focus, of course, will remain on her cakes.

Bouren can make a cake shaped like just about anything. She's made cakes that look like pirate ships and basketball sneakers, Mad Hatter hats and Jeeps. She's even made a cake in the shape of Lionel Richie's head.

She's been eyeing this particular location for five years, having first spotted the distinctive lime green storefront while out walking her dog. And it just so happened that the building's owner has been keeping their eye out for Bouren, too. Her landlord owns the floral shop Blossoms right next door.

"The owner was very interested in Cake Ambition as a tenant. It's a good combination for a cake shop to move in next to florists," says Bouren. "He held that space for me for a year."

Bouren is designing the shop to reflect her own style, which she characterizes as eclectic. She says it will have a vintage mid-century vibe mixed in with bright pops of color.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Restoration of the Treymore Apartments building results in 28 affordable housing units in Midtown

Detroiters feeling the pinch of rising rental rates in the city's greater downtown have reason to turn their attention to Brainard Street. There, in the bustling development hotspot between Wayne State University and Little Caesars Arena is the Treymore, will be an affordable housing redevelopment that offers 28 one- and two-bedroom units to Detroiters earning 50 to 60 percent of the area's average median income.

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan cut the ribbon on the redveloped apartment building this past Friday, Dec. 9.

"These are the kinds of projects the City of Detroit is happy to support because they are example of how Detroit comes back, there is room and opportunity for everyone," says Mayor Duggan. The city contributed $3.5 million in HOME program funds.

A number of other organizations contributed to the redevelopment, creating a patchwork of financing. The Michigan State Housing Development Authority (MSHDA) contributed $3 million in affordable housing tax credits. Cinnaire financed and syndicated the MSHDA credits. And the building's developer, Paradise Valley Investment Group (PVI), contributed hundreds of thousands in private equity and brownfield tax credits.

In all, it cost $7 million to renovate the building, which has sat vacant for over two decades. The condition of the building forced developers to completely strip it of infrastructure and start fresh, requiring the installation of new windows, energy efficient HVAC, and lighting. Also new is the roof, landscaping, and greenspace.

The Treymore is a four story, 30,000 sq. ft. building erected in the early 1900s. Two-thirds of the 28 units are already leased.

"Restoring this building has been life changing," says PVI president and CEO, Robin Scovill. "Its condition when we started, juxtaposed with the finished product, is shocking."

The Treymore is located at 457 Brainard St.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

November development news round-up: New homes in North Corktown, a new home for basketball, and more

Let's catch up on some of the biggest stories from the past five weeks.

While it's Corktown that receives the lion's share of development attention, its neighbor across the freeway, North Corktown, has been in the news lately, too. Construction of traditionally-financed single-family homes will begin in Spring 2017 on Ash and Sycamore streets, featuring contemporary designs by Christian Hurttienne Architects. Meanwhile, an affordable housing development that stretches across 54 acres was reported by the Detroit News and includes "elite" New York architect Alexander Gorlin and possibly Grammy-winning musician Pharrell Williams. There is, however, no official word on any timeline.

The Detroit Pistons are moving back to their namesake city, 38 years after leaving the cozy confines of Cobo Arena for the Pontiac Silverdome in 1978. The basketball organization announced this month that they will be joining the Detroit Red Wings hockey team in occupying Little Caesars Arena, which is currently under construction just north of downtown. Both teams will open their 2017-18 seasons in the new arena. Rumored sites for a Pistons practice facility include a West Grand Boulevard location in New Center. The Pistons are leaving The Palace of Auburn Hills, built by former owner William Davidson in 1988.

In historic preservation news, the CPA Building across from Michigan Central Station has been saved from demolitionat least for now. It was reported earlier this month that the building's owners, the New York City-based BFD Corktown LLC, were granted a demolition permit for the building. But as news broke, preservation and neighborhood advocates quickly mobilized, gathering over 1,000 signatures to petition its destruction. Detroit City Council took note and granted the building, which opened in 1923, an interim historic building designation, delaying demolition for up to one year and opening it up to further studies.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Two alley festivals to take place this Saturday in Midtown

Often an afterthought in most neighborhoods, the alley is kind of a special thing in Midtown. There's Dally in the Alley, one of Detroit's longest-running street fairs, which celebrates the Cass Corridor with local music, art, and food vendors lining a neighborhood alley. There are the green alleys, which convert typically dank and uninviting alleys into charming walkways, complete with green methods of storm water management and the reintroduction of native plants. There's even the Garden Bowl, which, at over 100 years old, is the oldest continuously operating bowling alley in the country.

A new micro-festival will debut on Saturday, September 10, the same day as Dally in the Alley. The new event is called The Green Alley Gathering and it takes place in the Green Alley adjacent to Jolly Pumpkin and Third Man Records. Organized by Porterhouse Presents, the Gathering will celebrate the community and promote Midtown Detroit, Inc.'s Green Alley construction projects throughout the neighborhood.

Two music stages will bookend the alley, plus Man & Pan Paella will be serving their traditional meat, seafood, and vegan Spanish paella. A cash bar featuring Jolly Pumpkin, North Peak, and Civilized Spirits adult beverages will be located in Third Man Records.

Booked to play the first Green Alley Gathering is MarchFourth, a genre-mixing party marching band that also features acrobats and stilters, the Craig Brown Band, a local country-rock group recently signed to Third Man Records, and the Silent Disco, a multimedia experience that has listeners wear headphones at the concert. Silent Disco will include sets from DJ Psycho, DJ Prim, and more.

The Green Alley Gathering is Saturday, September 10 and runs from 6:00 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. Tickets are $10 in advance and $15 at the door. It is located in the Green Alley between 2nd and Cass Avenues and West Canfield and West Willis Streets.

Dally in the Alley is Saturday, September 10 and runs from 11:00 a.m to 11:00 p.m. between Forest Avenue and Hancock Street and 2nd and 3rd Avenues. The event is free.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

July development news round-up: Big residential projects on Selden

Let's catch up on some of the biggest stories from the past four weeks.

Two more residential developments were announced in Midtown this month. The first is the rehab of 678 Selden St., a 22,796 sq. ft. vacant apartment building. Dubbed the H.R. Finn Apartments, the $3.7 million investment will result in 28 apartments and two commercial units. Built in 1922, the building has been vacant for the past seven years. Construction, which includes brand new plumbing, heating, electrical work, and more, is expected to wrap up in late 2017.

Travel east down Selden Street and one will find another residential development, this one being built from the ground up. Slated for a summer 2017 opening, The Selden is a four story building consisting of 12 for-sale condos. Retail and office space is reserved for the ground floor while renderings reveal a roof-top deck. The Selden replaces the Marie Apartments building, which was razed in May 2016.

The city of Detroit released an RFP for the Fitzgerald Revitalization Project, a three-part strategy for stabilizing and improving life in the Fitzgerald neighborhood. The plan calls for a new park and greenway, converting empty parcels into economically sustainable and productive spaces like orchards and gardens, and saving and utilizing empty buildings throughout the neighborhood. Fitzgerald is bound by McNichols to the north, Livernois to the east, Puritan to the south, and Greenlawn to the west.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Motor City Match completes first year of programming, 11 more businesses awarded grants

Detroit continues to grow its base of entrepreneurs through its Motor City Match program, awarding 11 more grants ranging from $15,000 to $75,000 to area businesses. The awards, announced July 20, complete the fourth round of Motor City Match, marking one full year for the quarterly program.

That pipeline of entrepreneurs, as Detroit Economic Growth Corporation CEO Rodrick Miller calls it, consists largely of Detroiters. According to figures released by Motor City Match, 64 percent of MCM winning businesses are owned by Detroiters, 72 percent are minority-owned, and 68 percent are woman-owned.

In the program's first year, Motor City Match has awarded $2 million in grants to 40 small businesses, leveraging over $13 million in total investment in the city.

This round of grant winners include:
  • Twisted Roots, a beauty supply retailer in Eastern Market
  • Block Party, a building on Livernois that will house two restaurants and the Live6 Alliance
  • Detroit Vegan Soul, a West Village restaurant opening a second location on Grand River
  • Norma G's, a Caribbean cuisine food truck opening a brick-and-mortar location on East Jefferson
  • Live Cycle Delight, a cycling studio opening in West Village
  • Amaze-Enjoyment, an early childhood center at 20067 John R Street
  • Guadalajara #2, a butcher shop expanding into a full-service facility in Southwest
  • Lil Brilliant Mindz, an east side daycare and Head Start facility
  • Beau Bien Fine Foods, an artisanal jam, fruit preserve, chutney, and mustard maker expanding in Eastern Market
  • Meta Physical Wellness Center, an affordable holistic spa opening in Corktown
  • Third Wave Music, a music instrument retailer opening in the Forest Arms building in Midtown
"These are the kinds of businesses that help to create complete neighborhoods where people want to live," says Mayor Mike Duggan. "Motor City Match is helping dozens of Detroit entrepreneurs live their dream owning their own business while being a real part of our city’s neighborhood comeback."

In addition to the 11 businesses awarded grants, seven others will receive free design and architectural services, 26 have been connected with landlords, and 50 more will receive free business planning support.

The next round of the Motor City Match application process begins Sep. 1 and closes Oct. 1.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.

Stadt Garten, a pop-up beer garden, to debut in Midtown

A beer garden is popping up in Midtown this Saturday, July 16, from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. The inaugural Stadt GartenGerman for "City Garden," a nod to co-founder Mark R. Beard's German heritageis the first of several planned this summer. Proceeds from the event will benefit Hostel Detroit.

The setting for Stadt Garten is the yard a Gothic-Victorian mansion built in the 1880s. Beard was part of the team that redeveloped the property, which has three residential units, a clothing shop, and, now, a beer garden.

Why does Beard, who lives in one of the aforementioned residential units, wants to invite a couple hundred strangers to party in his yard?

"It's more important now than it has been in the recent past to come together as a community," he said via text message. "I don't really know of any better way to start knocking down some of the implicit biases that exist in peoples' minds than spending time with one another (in a positive way). Also, horseshoes!"

He added, "And, there's too much mulch in the yard and not enough people."

Vendors for Stadt Garten are mostly local. Corktown brewery Batch Brewing Company will be supplying four different types of beer, ranging from $5 to $7 each. Sfumato Fragrances will offer scented cocktails. Wine and food will also be on hand.

Will Leather Goods, the retailer located across the street, will be selling their own cold brew coffee blend, roasted by Tailored Coffee Roasters. Vice Cream, the vegan ice cream business that operates out of an Air Stream trailer, will bring their dairy-free treats to Stadt Garten, as well.

From 7 to 10 p.m., Ryan Spencer from local eletropop group Jamaican Queens will spin records. Detroit Clothing Circle, the retailer located in the house, will be open during the duration of the beer garden. Beer pong and staring contests, too, are planned.

Stadt Garten is located at 3980 Second Ave.

Got a development news story to share? Email MJ Galbraith here or send him a tweet @mikegalbraith.
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