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Young men, looking for educational options? Check out Loyola

After a recent City Kids features, we got a message from Loyola High School of Detroit, a West Side Catholic school in the Jesuit tradition. Last year, the school celebrated its 20th Anniversary educating young men in Detroit. 

Loyola High School is open to any male student of high school age from a private or public school background, provided the student meets the admissions criteria and provided he and his family are supportive of the mission and philosophy of Loyola.

Loyola charges a tuition of $4100 plus fees, and makes every attempt to take qualified students regardless of their financial resources. Scholarships are available up to the full tuition amount.

A student interested in Loyola High School takes an entrance exam and furnishes the school with a record of his last several academic years. Then he and his parents/guardians meet with the director of admissions or the principal. During this conversation, the student's test scores and previous academic records are reviewed, and the school's mission philosophy and policies are discussed. This interview allows the family and the school to get to know more about each other and to help determine the appropriateness of Loyola for the student.  

Loyola is designed to start with its students in the ninth grade. However, varying from year to year, the school might be able to take in a very limited number of transfer students who meet all of Loyola's requirements. The principal and the dean will handle these cases, at most few in number, on an individual basis. 

For more info on Loyola, go here.  

Remembering Colin Hubbell on fifth anniversary of his passing

In August 2008, shortly after developer Colin Hubbell lost his battle with cancer, we published this heartfelt remembrance of one of Detroit's truest and dearest friends. His spirit lives on in developments accelerating throughout Midtown and in other parts of the city.

We also found this video that, for those not familar with Hubbell's life and work, provides an excellent introduction.

Please note there is mention in the video of the Colin Hubbell Fund, which is now closed. During its over 5-year existence, the fund supported improvements for small businesses and public spaces in Midtown Detroit, where Colin was instrumental in developing housing (most notably on Canfield and Ferry Streets) and advocating for more walkable, bikeable neighborhoods.

Does high auto insurance impact Detroit elections?

Something everyone knows but is rarely seen in print is how high insurance costs in Detroit impact the quality of life and, yes, the quality of electoral politics.

From Bridge Mag via the Freep:

Vince Keenan, founder of Publius.org, a Michigan voter-education and civic-participation program, says the link between insurance rates and one’s registered address is "the most well-known single fact" about voting in Detroit. And he doesn’t like it.

"It's an unintended consequence of Motor-Voter," he said, or the National Voter Registration Act of 1993, which tied voter registration to one’s driver’s license. "It was very successful at getting people registered, especially in Michigan, because we drive so much. But by marrying the two, we have to think about (the auto-insurance issue), and we shouldn’t have to. For a voter to have to worry about where their car insurance is, is stupid. We’ve made it easier to commit community fraud, where you’re living and working in a community that you’re not voting in, than to commit insurance fraud."

Keenan knows the price of honesty from experience. In 2002, he moved two blocks -- from one block north of Eight Mile Road, in Ferndale, to one block south, in Detroit, and saw his annual premium jump from $1,700 to $3,700.

"We need voters in Detroit who are active and engaged about it," he said. "Where you choose to vote should not be governed by your car insurance, period."

Read more here.

Curbed Detroit: Palmer Park rises again

We love Palmer Park. The residential buildings, the accessability of nearby Palmer Woods, Sherwood Forest, the Avenue of Fashion and other leafy neighborhoods. Not to mention the lovely green space itself.

Curbed Detroit updates impressive work being done on the apartment houses here.

Sugar House earns 'Best Cocktail in America' tip

Nationally recognized, extraordinarily origianl and innovative drinks aplenty at Corktown's Sugar House? Why, yes. No surprise to us nor to fans of the tiny liquor den on Michigan Avenue near 14th St.

Read all about the boozy accolades here.

Detroit Bikes ready to roll (and rock)

Detroit Bikes LLC rolls-out its new A-Type commuter bicycle Aug. 16 at a launch party at the Old Miami bar on Cass Avenue.  The first in a series of such events throughout the United States and Canada, the Detroit launch party will feature displays and demonstrations of the A-Type, complimentary food and a performance by the Detroit Cobras. The party runs 5 to 9 p.m. for the general public.

The Detroit Bikes A-Type is the company’s first model, a minimalist bike with smooth shifting three-speed internal gears, a lightweight chromoly-steel frame and a durable, matte-black powder-coat finish.

Each bicycle frame is built from steel tubing cut, coped, welded and painted in Detroit Bikes’ 50,000 square-foot factory on Elmira street on the city's West Side. The company also builds the wheels and fabricates the bike's rear rack, chain guard, and bottom bracket on site. Final assembly in the Detroit factory includes these, and other components, plus steel fenders and pedals from Taiwan.

The Canadian roll-out begins Aug. 17 in Windsor.

The A-Type commuter bicycle is available in the U.S. for a suggested retail price of $550 and will be available for sale locally at the Wheelhouse on the Detroit River Walk.

Detroit Bikes seeks to encourage cycling by making an accessible, enjoyable bicycle while continuing Detroit's legacy of quality manufacturing and design. Its headquarters and factory are at 13639 Elmira, Detroit.

Tour de Troit forms nonprofit to promote cycling, walking and running in Detroit

Tour de Troit, which will host its 12th annual signature ride through the neighborhoods of Detroit on Sept. 21, is celebrating its new status as a 501(c) 3 nonprofit with an open-house event for supporters at its new offices at 2727 Second Ave. this Wednesday, Aug.14, 5-7 pm.

The nonprofit was established in January with a mission to "promote and encourage bicycling and bicycle safety through education, public events, collaboration with community and government organizations and support for non-motorized infrastructure."

In addition to the signature Tour de Troit event, the organization also sponsors four other events throughout the year: the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Bike Ride in January, Hamtramck PaczKi Run in February, the Run du Nain Rouge in March, and Cycle into Spring in May.

A nine-member board now oversees the organization, which was started by Detroiters Mike Kiewicz and Edward Potas in 2002 as a casual ride through city neighborhoods. Since 2005, the organization has raised more than $120,000 for Detroit greenways and non-motorized transportation projects.

Writer: Nina Ignaczak

SMART general manager John Hertel to lead RTA

The Regional Transit Authority of Southeast Michigan has voted 9-1 to offer John Hertel, general manager of SMART, the position of chief executive. The vote took place Aug. 7. 

Hertel was chosen from an initial field of 11 candidates that was whittled down to three. The other two finalists include a former deputy commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Transportation and a former president of a transit agency in the St. Louis area. 

Hertel led the Southeast Michigan Regional Transit Coordinating Council in developing the 2008 Comprehensive Regional Transit Service Plan, which laid groundwork for the eventual creation of the RTA.

Read more about it here.

Writer: Nina Ignaczak

D:hive announces Pilot winner, bringing CANVASxDetroit downtown

On Monday, D:hive announced the winner of its Pilot program, awarding two months of free retail space to Brandon Colvin of CANVASxDetroit.

CANVASxDetroit is an exploratory art business providing classes and art-based entertainment. Colvin will receive two months of free rental space at 1249 Woodward Ave., along with marketing and build out support for the space. 

"We're excited to bring additional art and entertainment to the city," said April Boyle, director of small business initiatives for D:hive Detroit. "CANVASxDetroit follows a business model that’s proven successful in neighboring areas, and will help enhance our art community in the city."

CANVASxDetroit will be open for business Aug. 12-Oct. 5. The pop-up will offer guided and open paint sessions for groups and individuals providing music, prominent art instructors, and other art-focused events. It will also include Free Paint Sessions where individuals can rent out the space and equipment for a flat fee.

Brandon Colvin, founder of CANVASxDetroit, has over 10 years of strategic marketing and business experience. Colvin has been practicing art for over 25 years. Colvin also has significant experience in educational instruction to both adults and youth working at the YMCA and studying pedagogy as a Ronald E. McNair Scholar and UNCF Mellon-Mays Undergraduate Fellow.

Pilot was developed by D:hive Detroit and Opportunity Detroit to spur retail business growth in the city. For more information on Pilot, go here.

So what do people overseas think of when they think of Detroit? Techno, of course

This may come as some surprise to the non-dancing, groove-intolerant among us, but not to those of us who heard the rhythmic call of the wild beginning in the 1980s and stuck with it. Go to any big city most anywhere in the world and you will hear Detroit techno in clubs, festivals, restaurants, cafes, cool retailers and record stores; and meet people who are considering a pilgrimage just to experience the danceable, soulful vibe of this place.

MLive has the story here.

Making it in Detroit

Do we ever get tired of writing about the producers and makers that appear to be multiplying, in the central business district at least? Nah. Neither does national media like Fast Company, which featured a two-part series on the innovators that are bringing change to the regional economy.

Read all about it here.

RT America takes inside look at local innovators and entrepreneurs

In this video report, cameras head over to Techtown to talk to president and CEO Leslie Smith about growth over the past 3-5 years; and our own Model D publisher Claire Nelson, who talks about the resurgence of neighborhood retail districts.

Good stuff. Check it out here.

Freep: Next five years likely better than the last 10 in downtown

Detroit John Gallagher reporter lists the developments that are changing downtown for the better, creating a more vibrant place for people who work, live and visit there. We see it happening before our eyes.

Read his report here.

NYT: 'Low Winter Sun' plays like season 6 of the Wire

Well, like yeah, wow. We've heard some pretty good things about this new series about bad Detroit cops seeking redemption in a hard city, but nothing so poetically right on as David Carr's piece with tasty quotes from cast members of 'Low Winter Sun,' which premieres this Sunday (Aug. 11) on AMC.

Read it all here.

Detroit Cobras to party for Detroit Bikes

Put this on your August calendar, rockers and cyclists. It's a Detroit Bikes launch event featuring the badass Detroit Cobras, who've been doing the "cha cha twist" all around the world since forming in 1994.

It's Aug. 16 at the Old Miami, free and open to the public. There will be snacks, drinks, and great music, so grab a girl or guy and come on down and dance up front by the stage. Our friends at Wheelhouse Detroit Bike Shop provide the bike racks.

For more details go here.
3072 Articles | Page: | Show All
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