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'Give grass a chance,' says Navin Field Grounds Crew about Tiger Stadium site

Since the demolition of Tiger Stadium in 2009, a group of unpaid volunteers calling themselves the Navin Field Grounds Crew have worked to maintain the site where the likes of Ty Cobb, Babe Ruth, and Hank Greenberg all played. Since then, countless people have enjoyed the historic site, from youth and vintage baseball players to Corktown residents walking their dogs to people trotting around the bases while imitating Kirk Gibson's legendary 1984 World Series home run off of Goose Gossage. A handful of couples have even gotten married at home plate.

The way people enjoy the historic site of Navin Field could soon change, however. Last summer, Detroit PAL, a sports organization serving youth in the city, was granted development rights for the site at the corner of Michigan and Trumbull. The group's plans call for housing, retail, and office space around the perimeter of the playing field, which will be replaced with artificial turf for the purposes of continuous youth sports programming.

That's where the Navin Field Grounds crew takes issue.

"All we are saying is give grass a chance," says Dave Mesrey, co-founder of the Navin Field Grounds Crew, which recently printed shirts sporting the same slogan.

Mesrey and the Grounds Crew point to recent stories suggesting that artificial turf could have negative health effects on children, as well historical importance of the original field as reasons for keeping the grass.

On Wednesday, Oct. 28, the Navin Field Grounds Crew and the Corktown Community Organization are hosting a forum on the future of Navin Field at the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers local at 1358 Abbott St. in Corktown. The event, which starts at 6:30 p.m., will feature a public discussion on public access to the Navin Field site, artificial turf versus natural grass, retail and residential development, and more.

Representatives will be on hand from the Old Tiger Stadium Conservancy, the Navin Field Grounds CrewDetroit PAL, and Tiger Stadium Partners.

To learn more, click here.

Detroit Experience Series returns with Oct. 24 tour of northwest Detroit

Since 2005, Model D has told stories of positive neighborhood transformation, from the development of new businesses to the redevelopment of old buildings to the perseverance of long-term residents in the face of challenges. As we celebrate our 10th anniversary, we invite you to experience neighborhood transformation in Detroit firsthand through the Detroit Experience Series, a partnership between Model D and the Detroit Experience Factory.
 
Our tours will re-introduce (or simply introduce) you to the small businesses and people in the following neighborhoods:
  
Northwest Detroit (Saturday, October 24, 10 a.m.-noon) – Includes Palmer Woods, Sherwood Forest, University District, and the Avenue of Fashion. (Get tickets)

Jefferson East (Saturday, November 14, 10 a.m.-noon) – Includes the Villages, the East Riverfront, and Jefferson-Chalmers. (Get tickets)
 
Tours cost $25 for early bird tickets and $30 for general tickets and last approximately 2 hours.
 
Whether you're a long-term resident wanting to learn more about your neighborhood or a complete newbie, you'll discover something new through the Detroit Experience Series. Sign up today!

Grace Lee Boggs, Detroit activist and philosopher, dies at 100

 
Democracy Now! and the Metro Times are reporting that one of Detroit's most well-known and best-loved activists, Grace Lee Boggs, has passed away at age 100.
 
Ms. Boggs was known for her work in the civil rights, labor, and black power movements. She inspired generations of leaders in the world of social justice activism. She founded the Detroit Summer youth program in 1992. Her live and work were documented in the 2014 PBS film "American Revolutionary" by director Grace Lee.
 
The James and Grace Lee Boggs School, named in honor of Ms. Boggs and her late husband, also a beloved local activist, issued the following statement on its Facebook page:
 
"With heavy hearts, we want to share the passing of Grace Lee Boggs today. She was 100 years old. We want to give families a chance to talk about it with children before we talk about it here. We will be talking about it as a school tomorrow at our all-school morning meeting. Our school community will miss her deeply."
 
Read more: Democracy Now!, Metro Times

Knight Cities Challenge returns, wants your ideas to help Detroit succeed

 
For the second year, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation is accepting applications for "the best ideas for cities to succeed" as a part of its Knight Cities Challenge. The application period is open now through Oct. 27 for anyone living in one of the 26 communities where the Knight Foundation invests, Detroit included.
 
According to a release from the Knight Foundation, "winners will receive a share of $5 million and become part of a network of civic innovators; funding will be granted at all levels from small to large amounts." Last year, 32 Knight Cities Challenge winners were selected from over 7,200 applications. Five of those winners were located in Detroit. For descriptions of those projects, click here.
 
One of the hallmarks of the challenge is its openness with regard to who can apply. "The challenge is open to anyone from anywhere: neighbors, architects, activists, artists, city planners, entrepreneurs, students, educators, city officials, as well as governments and organizations," writes the Knight Foundation.
 
If you have questions about the challenge, the Detroit office of the Knight Foundation invites you to virtual office hours or in-person events to learn more. Two public information sessions will be held at TechTown (440 Burroughs, Detroit):
• Tuesday, Oct. 6, 6 – 8 p.m. Limited seating. RSVP here.
• Monday, Oct. 19, 6-8 p.m. Limited seating. RSVPhere.
The schedule of all in-person and virtual office hours, which is regularly updated, can be accessed here.
 
Learn more and apply to the Knight Cities Challenge at knightcities.org.

What will Detroit look like in the next 25-50 years?

If we think of the city as a platform, how can we make sure Detroit is ready for the next 25 or 50 years and beyond? What changes should happen in the world of technology and city infrastructure? We want to hear your thoughts at a discussion taking place on Tuesday, Sept. 29, at 5:30 p.m. at Bamboo Detroit.

Join us for food and the following: 

5:30 p.m – 6 p.m. - Meet and greet 
6 p.m. – 7 p.m. - Panel discussion 
7 p.m. – 8 p.m. - Mingling and networking

Joining us on this panel is April Boyle, executive director of Build Institute; Marc Hudson, co-founder of Rocket Fiber; Eric Williams, head of entrepreneurship at WSU; and Steve Baker, director of IT strategy and innovation at DTE Energy. This discussion will be moderated by Matt Lewis, managing editor of Model D.

This event will be hosted at Bamboo Detroit, a co-working space on the second floor of 1442 Brush street. Parking is located in lots off of Gratiot and Brush, and nearby at the Opera House and Z Lot.

Learn more: Facebook

Stunning short film showcases design in Detroit

Detroit filmmaker Stephen McGee has put together one of the most impressive short films we've ever seen on Detroit.
 
Clocking in at just under 4 minutes, "Detroit: City of Design" depicts the city's architecture, people, and products in stunning detail. The film was commissioned by the Detroit Creative Corridor Center to showcase the city's design talent and aesthetic. It is set to a soundtrack of compositions by Detroit artists that was curated by Assemble Sound.
 
"I hope it compels more people outside of our circles to support our city," writes McGee in a Facebook message to Model D.
 
The montage of Detroit scenes is composed of long tracking shots, drone footage, hyper lapse shots, and detailed zooms.
 
"The film has many creative camera angles," writes McGee. "Hyper lapse is one creative technique. It's traveling a traditional time lapse over a variable distance, which can be by foot, car or boat -- or plane even. The fluidity of shooting across many scenes took a fair amount of planning and the payoff could only really be realized in the edit. Every camera movement was made to inspire the next to integrate with the work happening at each location."
 
McGee, who has been shooting footage in Detroit for the last nine years, recently announced on Facebook his intention to create a feature documentary film about the city. "I think this film will stand as a visual bookmark of our past decade," he writes.
 
To learn more about his upcoming documentary project, visit http://www.thedetroitfilm.com/.
 
Watch "Detroit: City of Design" below:


NAACP branch in the works for the Grosse Pointes

 
Historically the Grosse Pointes have been closed to people of color, but that has begun to change in recent years, particularly in Grosse Pointe Park, where now over 10 percent of residents are black. Yet the Pointes have a long way to go before they are seen as welcoming communities. That's why two Grosse Pointe residents, Greg Bowens of the city of Grosse Pointe and Elaine Flowers of Grosse Pointe Park, have decided to organize a new chapter of the NAACP representing the five Pointes and neighboring Harper Woods.
 
According to Bill Laitner of the Detroit Free Press:
 
"Flowers wants the group to produce fine arts programs such as plays and concerts, organize discussion groups, arrange integrated youth activities and more. Bowens wants it to foster community-wide conversations about such local, pragmatic issues as whether the school district would benefit from having more black teachers — in fact, any black teachers, he said."
 
A meeting to discuss the potential for forming a Grosse Pointe NAACP chapter will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 23, at 7 p.m. at Rockefellers Oyster Bar & Grill in Grosse Pointe Park.
 
Read more: Detroit Free Press

Get down with Banglatown at Oct. 3 block party

 
In recent years, Detroit's Banglatown neighborhood (located just north of Hamtramck) has become known as much for resident artists and community-based art projects as its sizeable Bangladeshi population. Community arts organization Power House Productions, performance art group The Hinterlands, the Bangla School of Music, and winners of Write a House (a permanent artist residency giving away homes to writers) all call Banglatown home, resulting in a neighborhood with many cultural assets.
 
That cultural richness will be on display on Saturday, Oct. 3, during the Banglatown Block Party. According to its Facebook event page, the party will feature arts and culture programming the showcases various project sites Power House Productions has been working on over the past 5 years. Events and activities are planned for houses on Moran, Lawley and Klinger streets, including a workshop with The Hinterlands, music by Bangla School of Music, screenprinting with One Custom City, badminton matches at Sqaush House, and exhibitions by poet Casey Rocheteau and photographer Corine Vermeulen. Later in the day, hip hop duo Passalacqua will emcee a neighborhood talent show and food will be available at Ride It Sculpture Park.
 
Learn more: Facebook

What new Census data reveal about demographic changes in Detroit

Last Wednesday, the U.S. Census released new data that tell us a lot about demographic trends in the city of Detroit. In a series of insightful reports, the Detroit News breaks down those data. Here is what they found:
 
- Detroit's population is still declining, but at a much slower rate than in recent decades. "Detroit’s population was at 680,281 in 2014, down an estimated 8,459 residents from 2013, according to the data. That’s a smaller loss than the previous year’s drop of 12,784," write Louis Aguilar and Christine MacDonald for the Detroit News.

- For the first time in over half a century, Detroit is showing statistically significant gains in the number of white residents. "The new data, paired with the recent estimates of small gains, suggests an increase of more than 14,000 whites since 2010," reports The News. The city's white population is now at 10.2 percent, increasing by 1.3 percentage points from 2013 to 2014. The city's black population (79.1 percent) and Latino population (7.2 percent) both showed small, statistically insignificant declines in 2014. The data suggest that the influx of whites has helped slow the overall decline in the city's population.

- Detroit is the poorest big city in the U.S. The median household income for a family of four in the city is a paltry $25,769, and 39.3 percent of all Detroiters live below the poverty line.
 
Read more in the Detroit News:

"Detroit's white population up after decades of decline"

"Census bureau: Detroit is poorest big city in U.S."

Slows Bar B Q turns 10

Model D's not the only Detroit institution celebrating its 10th birthday this year. Corktown's Slows Bar B Q turns 10 on Wednesday, September 16, and you're invited to celebrate.

According to Susan Selasky of the Detroit Free Press, Slows will be "giving away 200 free limited edition commemorative 10-Year T-shirts from the Dirt Label, which is donating its fee to charity (while supplies last)"; "donating money from all purchases of The Reason sandwich and mac & cheese to D-Town Farms, the urban agriculture initiative of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network;" and "charging $2 for all Michigan draft beer."

Want to learn more about the Slows story? Check out this Model D special report about the growth of this iconic Detroit business and its impact on its neighborhood.

Slows' 10th anniversary party takes place this Wednesday, September 16, from 11 a.m. until 11 p.m.

Read more: Detroit Free Press

Parking enforcement ramps up this week

You may have noticed that parking enforcement in Detroit has been lax over the last few months. That's because the Municipal Parking Department has been allowing local motorists to get acquainted with its new $3.5 million parking system that replaces antiquated meters with state-of-the-art parking technology.
 
Starting Tuesday, however, the free ride (er, park) is over, and "parking enforcement officers…will resume writing tickets citywide for violators of Detroit’s new parking regulations," reports the Detroit News.
 
In addition to having a new way to pay for parking, motorists also have a new way to contest tickets they think are undeserved. "[T]he city has also established a new process of contesting tickets through the website www.ParkDetroit.us, eliminating the need for motorists to physically appear," officials told the Detroit News.
 
Read more: Detroit New

Did someone just write the first honest review of Detroit's food scene?


There's no denying it: Detroit's food scene is growing like a pubescent adolescent. New spots are popping up every week, and there's more delicious food being served in the city than there has been in quite some time. It is important, however, to keep some perspective.
 
That's exactly what Jenny Miller does in her refreshingly honest and rather insightful review of Detroit's emerging food scene for Food Republic, a national blog covering food and food culture.
 
While Miller is a tough critic ("Nothing blew my mind," she writes), she presents an incredibly fair and well-reasoned big picture view of the city's food scene (as well as Detroit's development flux).
 
She writes:
 
"Detroit at the moment simply isn’t the kind place where you can dash off a list of the top ten spots to eat and leave it at that, because you’d be missing most of the story. What’s more fascinating is how this city in flux came to be what it currently is, and where it’s going. Restaurants are one lens onto that."
 
On Townhouse, a new restaurant operating in the Dan Gilbert owned One Detroit Center, Miller writes:
 
"If this place opened in New York, it would be another clubby spot for the bridge-and-tunnel or finance crowd, but here it’s significant. There just aren’t many restaurants like this in central Detroit: somewhere to dress up and make an evening of dinner out, or to head to after an event for drinks and late-night snacks."
 
Miller also proves an astute observer of the culture of development that's on the rise in the city:
 
"For some, there’s a feeling that the era of opportunity in Detroit has already passed, but not for the group of fresh-faced Harvard Business School graduates whose barbecue I crashed one night. These young people, mostly transplants and recent arrivals, spoke quickly and excitedly, describing their real estate ventures with an intensity that contrasted with the laid-back Midwesterners I’d been chatting with until then."
 
Finally, she points out that Detroit's growing food scene isn't something that magically sprang from the ground, but rather something that is the result of a lot of people's hard work:
 
"Still, this kind of entrepreneurship often has to be pulled off creatively, since one of the great ironies in a city with so much vacant real estate is that mortgages and financing can be extremely difficult to come by. [Slows Bar B Q owner Philip] Cooley describes how it took a team effort to open his latest restaurant, nine-month-old Gold Cash Gold, down the street from Slows on Michigan Avenue. 'All of our friends with full-time jobs were willing to show up and start cleaning or sanding and still go to their 9-to-5’s,' he says."
 
Read more: Food Republic

Free Press explores Detroit's top 35 street art pieces


Detroit is a Mecca for street artists. That's part of the reason why Eastern Market-based 1xRun decided to host the upcoming 9-day mural festival called Murals in the Market, which will bring street artists from around the world to Detroit from Sept. 17-25.
 
Before they get here, however, take some time to explore what's already in Detroit. Start with this amazing feature by Detroit Free Press writer Mark Stryker and photographer/videographer Romain Blanquart, which lays out Detroit's top 35 street art pieces, from the Alley Project in southwest Detroit, to Charles McGee's untitled 1974 modernist mural in downtown Detroit, to the many pieces of the Grand River Creative Corridor, and more.
 
Enjoy!
 
Read more: Detroit Free Press

Write a House, Detroit's permanent writer's residency, announces 10 finalists

 
Last year, Write a House renovated a vacant house it had purchased at the Wayne County tax foreclosure auction, then gave it away to poet Casey Rocheteau -- for free. This year, Write a House will give a second formerly vacant house away to another worthy writer.
 
According to the organization's website, "Write a House is a twist on the 'Writer's Residency.' In this case, the writer is simply given the house, forever." The idea is to contribute to the neighborhood just north of Hamtramck (known to some as Banglatown) and strengthen the literary culture of Detroit.
 
This year, Write a House received 220 applications in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry from all over the United States and abroad, as well as right here in Detroit.
 
The finalists for this year's Write a House residency are:
 
Liana Aghajanian
Tujunga, CA
Nonfiction
http://www.lianaaghajanian.com
http://www.ianyanmag.com
@LianaAgh
 
Liana Aghajanian is an independent, Armenian-American journalist whose work explores the issues, people and places that remain hidden and on the fringes of society. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, The Guardian, Foreign Policy, BBC, Al Jazeera America, GOOD and The Atlantic among other publications. Reporting from Kenya, the UK, Germany, the South Caucasus and across the West Coast of the U.S., she covers issues at the intersection of culture, immigration, social justice, displacement and identity. She edits Ianyan Magazine, an independent-online journal on Armenia and its diaspora and authors a column for L.A. Times Community News on under-reported issues. Her work has received support from the Metlife Foundation Journalists in Aging Fellowship, the California Health Journalism Fellowship and the International Reporting Project at Johns Hopkins University.
 
Selected by dream hampton.
 
Glendaliz Camacho
New York, NY
Fiction
http://becomenzando.com
@Glendaliz

Glendaliz Camacho is a 2013 Pushcart Prize nominee, 2014 Jentel Foundation Artist in Residence, and 2015 Caldera Arts, Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, and Hedgebrook Artist in Residence. Glendaliz is an alum of the Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation Fiction Workshops. Her work appears in All About Skin: Short Fiction by Women of Color (University of Wisconsin Press), The Female Complaint: Tales of Unruly Women (Shade Mountain Press, 2015), The Butter, and Kweli Journal, among others. Glendaliz is currently working on a short story collection, fantasy novel, and essay collection.
 
“This piece surprised me the most of any of the submissions—it quickly drew rounded portraits of its characters and pulled me into their sure-to-be-tense relationship. More than any of the other pieces, I would have happily kept reading more.” Sean MacDonald

Katie Chase
Portland, OR
Fiction
www.katie-chase.com

Katie Chase's short fiction has appeared in The Missouri Review, Five Chapters, Narrative, Prairie Schooner, ZYZZYVA, Mississippi Review, and the Best American Short Stories and Pushcart Prize anthologies. A graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, she was the recipient of a Teaching-Writing Fellowship, a Provost’s Postgraduate Writing Fellowship, and a Michener-Copernicus Award. She has also been a fellow of the MacDowell Colony and the Center for Steinbeck Studies at San José State University. Born and raised outside Detroit, she lives currently in Portland, Oregon. Her first book is forthcoming from A Strange Object in 2016.

“Devil’s Night is an oft-explored theme, and yet this felt fresh, compelling, and true. Wasn’t really sure what to make of the last paragraph, but it held me nonetheless.” Toby Barlow

Allison Hedge Coke
Arcadia, OK
Poetry
http://www.hedgecoke.com
http://allisonhedgecoke.com
http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/allison-adelle-hedge-co
 
Allison Adelle Hedge Coke's authored books include Dog Road Woman, Off-Season City Pipe, Blood Run, Streaming, and Rock Ghost, Willow, Deer (memoir), and anthologies she edited, including: Sing: Poetry of the Indigenous Americas, Effigies and Effigies II. She also performs with the band Rd Kla. Hedge Coke came of age working fields, factories, and waters, and serves as an alternative field mentor. Awards for her work include an American Book Award, a Paterson Prize, a Sioux Falls Mayor’s Award, and residencies with MacDowell, Black Earth Institute, Hawthornden Castle, Weymouth Center, Center for the Great Plains, and Lannan at Marfa. Hedge Coke directs the annual Literary Sandhill Crane Retreat and is currently at work on an environmental documentary film, “Red Dust: resiliency in the dirty thirties.”

“(In her work), there is seriousness and ambition and scope for growth. It is densely packed and is mostly story-telling, anchored in a myth of blue-collar world. This is worth exploring.”  Michael Stone-Richards
 
Nandi Comer
Detroit, MI
Poetry
@NandiComer

Nandi Comer is the lead writer for Techno Poetics, a collaboration between Detroit music makers and writers. She has received fellowships from Indiana University, Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, Cave Canem, Callaloo, and Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. Her poems and essays have appeared or are forthcoming in To Light a Fire: 20 Years with the InsideOut Literary Arts Project (Wayne State University Press, 2014), A Detroit Anthology (Belt Publishing, 2014), Another and Another: An Anthology From the Grind Daily Writing Series (Bull City Press, 2012), Callaloo, Crab Orchard Review, Green Mountains Review, Southern Indiana Review, and Sycamore Review. She lives and works in Detroit.

“This poet plays with poetic form and verbal music in such a way that art amplifies social consciousness, violence, and cultural inheritance. This is the hallmark of literature that aims high, a kind of redemption song … I admire the maturity evident in this poets' work.”  Major Jackson
 
Jaquira Díaz
Miami, FL
Fiction
http://www.jaquiradiaz.com
@JaquiraDiaz
 
Jaquira Díaz is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, a Florida Individual Artist Fellowship, the Carl Djerassi Fiction Fellowship from the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, a Bread Loaf waitership, and an NEA Fellowship to the Hambidge Center for the Arts. She's been awarded fellowships or scholarships from the Sewanee Writers' Conference, The MacDowell Colony, Summer Literary Seminars, and the Tin House Writers' Workshop. A finalist for the Richard J. Margolis Award in journalism, her work is noted in Best American Essays 2012 and 2014, Best American Nonrequired Reading 2014, anthologized in Pushcart Prize XXXVII: Best of the Small Presses, and appears in Ploughshares, The Kenyon Review, The Sun, The Southern Review, Salon, Five Chapters, TriQuarterly, The Rumpus, and The Los Angeles Review of Books, among other publications.   
 
“The author has a strong sense of voice and language that drives these three short pieces. Even in the single paragraph that is ‘December’, the language has a natural cadence and sense of urgency that propels the narrative in two lyrical sentences. ‘Seasons of Risks’ captures the adolescent appetite for danger.” Tamara Warren
 
Matthew Fogarty
Columbia, SC
Fiction
www.matthewfogarty.com
@ThatMattFogarty

Born and raised in the square-mile suburbs of Detroit, Matthew Fogarty has an MFA from the University of South Carolina, where he was editor of Yemassee. He also edits Cartagena, a literary journal. His fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in such journals as Passages North, Fourteen Hills, PANK, Smokelong Quarterly, and Midwestern Gothic. His short story collection, Maybe Mermaids and Robots are Lonely, will be published in Fall 2016 by Stillhouse Press, a publisher based at George Mason University.

“The first two shorts in this packet were the most interesting, in part because they're so different. The first tells of a man obsessed with telling and retelling the story of Pope John Paul II being elected, but the story varies wildly depending on the day, and ‘depending on what we'd eaten and how much he'd had to drink.’ The second is a more absurd story about two con artists staging fake accidents for cash, while traveling under the names of characters from The Legend of Zelda. There's a lot of varied imagination here, and I appreciated the range.” Matt Bell

J.M. Leija
Detroit, MI
Nonfiction
@j3mleija

J.M. Leija is a Detroiter at heart and proud to claim all the accompanying trials, travails, and joys that accompany such a statement. By day she is a teacher/disguised superhero who tries to convince her students that reading is cool. On nights and weekends, she turns into a writer who tortures herself over whether writing about things that have really happened and people who really exist can ever be truly ethical. She then proceeds to write about them anyway. Her work has previously been featured in A Detroit Anthology, Motif's Seeking It's Own Level anthology, and Pithead Chapel Magazine, and she has work forthcoming in the 3288 Review.

“This is a person who has something interesting to say, and in saying it, she exercises complete command of the language. The words do exactly what she wants them to at all times. This is no mean feat. There’s an ease and authority here that was unmatched in any of the other submissions I read. … this #1 lady is a writer. There is an instinctive understanding of how words fit and rhythm and le mot juste. This is the thing that can’t be taught.” Nancy Kaffer

M. Sophia Newman
Homewood, IL
Nonfiction
http://www.msophianewman.com
@msophianewman

M. Sophia Newman is a writer whose work has been published in the US, UK, Bangladesh, and Japan. She writes a column on global health, Health Horizons, for Next City. She's reported on infectious disease in West Africa via a crowd-funded project for Pacific Standard Magazine and on violence in South Africa and America with the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting. She received a 2014 Shannon Fellowship from Bellarmine University’s International Thomas Merton Society to report on environmentalism, and continued this work with a 2015 retreat at Collegeville Institute for Cultural and Ecumenical Studies. Prior to journalism, she completed a Critical Language Scholarship in Bangla (2011), followed by a year of health research as a Fulbright fellow in Bangladesh (2012-2013). She holds a bachelor of science in cell and molecular biology (Tulane, 2009) and a master's degree in public health from University of Illinois (2012). Sophia is a Bangla speaker who hopes to attain fluency for journalism and to translate Bangla-language literature. She has also won admission to a short program on global mental health at Harvard, and intends to complete a nonfiction book expanding on the violence prevention she explored via the Pulitzer grant.

Selected by dream hampton.
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/rkJwZGgtp_bzroGFLZ31m9PAEwfvboo4nEEeaJtG1vIBV04p8nu1uYwrcp_G_utup_wetrM1N4XT3wF42XiTyGW03M52XiYTBFocxQB-MBofMMs8jJPr_kNWGGN3iziHlAg98Dg
Katie Nichol
Fayetteville, AR
Poetry
http://www.nwaprisonstories.com/

Katie Nichol is a poet, educator, and activist based in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Recent work has appeared in Cream City Review, St. Petersburg Review, and Cannibal. She is the Creative Writing Director for Prison Story Project, and was a 2014 finalist for the Wisconsin Institute Creative Writing Fellowships. Prior to receiving her MFA from the University of Arkansas, Katie worked as an advocate with homeless youth in Minneapolis/St. Paul.
 
“Like many of the manuscripts, this one deals with strong subject matter—notes from a rough life—but here the matter is balanced with literary grace and a knowledgeable sense of form.  The manuscript includes a ghazal and a rather amazing poem that reads forwards and backwards.” Billy Collins

Job sprawl a major problem for Detroit residents

In a recent story for the Detroit News, Mike Wilkinson of Bridge Magazine confirmed what many Detroiters already knew: that there aren't enough jobs in the city of Detroit for its residents. The immensity of this problem, however, is shocking.
 
According to Wilkinson, "80 percent of city residents live more than 10 miles from a central business district, one of the highest rates of the country." On the whole, Detroit has approximately 200 jobs per 1,000 residents, which is significantly worse than other cities, even those also located in the Rust Belt. Cleveland, for example, has an about 481 jobs per 1,000 residents.
 
The problem is particularly bad on the city's west side, where there is less than one job for every 10 people.
 
Wilkinson points to poor public transportation systems as a major challenge to solving the jobs sprawl problem.
 
Read more: Detroit News
 
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