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What new Census data reveal about demographic changes in Detroit

Last Wednesday, the U.S. Census released new data that tell us a lot about demographic trends in the city of Detroit. In a series of insightful reports, the Detroit News breaks down those data. Here is what they found:
 
- Detroit's population is still declining, but at a much slower rate than in recent decades. "Detroit’s population was at 680,281 in 2014, down an estimated 8,459 residents from 2013, according to the data. That’s a smaller loss than the previous year’s drop of 12,784," write Louis Aguilar and Christine MacDonald for the Detroit News.

- For the first time in over half a century, Detroit is showing statistically significant gains in the number of white residents. "The new data, paired with the recent estimates of small gains, suggests an increase of more than 14,000 whites since 2010," reports The News. The city's white population is now at 10.2 percent, increasing by 1.3 percentage points from 2013 to 2014. The city's black population (79.1 percent) and Latino population (7.2 percent) both showed small, statistically insignificant declines in 2014. The data suggest that the influx of whites has helped slow the overall decline in the city's population.

- Detroit is the poorest big city in the U.S. The median household income for a family of four in the city is a paltry $25,769, and 39.3 percent of all Detroiters live below the poverty line.
 
Read more in the Detroit News:

"Detroit's white population up after decades of decline"

"Census bureau: Detroit is poorest big city in U.S."

Slows Bar B Q turns 10

Model D's not the only Detroit institution celebrating its 10th birthday this year. Corktown's Slows Bar B Q turns 10 on Wednesday, September 16, and you're invited to celebrate.

According to Susan Selasky of the Detroit Free Press, Slows will be "giving away 200 free limited edition commemorative 10-Year T-shirts from the Dirt Label, which is donating its fee to charity (while supplies last)"; "donating money from all purchases of The Reason sandwich and mac & cheese to D-Town Farms, the urban agriculture initiative of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network;" and "charging $2 for all Michigan draft beer."

Want to learn more about the Slows story? Check out this Model D special report about the growth of this iconic Detroit business and its impact on its neighborhood.

Slows' 10th anniversary party takes place this Wednesday, September 16, from 11 a.m. until 11 p.m.

Read more: Detroit Free Press

Parking enforcement ramps up this week

You may have noticed that parking enforcement in Detroit has been lax over the last few months. That's because the Municipal Parking Department has been allowing local motorists to get acquainted with its new $3.5 million parking system that replaces antiquated meters with state-of-the-art parking technology.
 
Starting Tuesday, however, the free ride (er, park) is over, and "parking enforcement officers…will resume writing tickets citywide for violators of Detroit’s new parking regulations," reports the Detroit News.
 
In addition to having a new way to pay for parking, motorists also have a new way to contest tickets they think are undeserved. "[T]he city has also established a new process of contesting tickets through the website www.ParkDetroit.us, eliminating the need for motorists to physically appear," officials told the Detroit News.
 
Read more: Detroit New

Did someone just write the first honest review of Detroit's food scene?


There's no denying it: Detroit's food scene is growing like a pubescent adolescent. New spots are popping up every week, and there's more delicious food being served in the city than there has been in quite some time. It is important, however, to keep some perspective.
 
That's exactly what Jenny Miller does in her refreshingly honest and rather insightful review of Detroit's emerging food scene for Food Republic, a national blog covering food and food culture.
 
While Miller is a tough critic ("Nothing blew my mind," she writes), she presents an incredibly fair and well-reasoned big picture view of the city's food scene (as well as Detroit's development flux).
 
She writes:
 
"Detroit at the moment simply isn’t the kind place where you can dash off a list of the top ten spots to eat and leave it at that, because you’d be missing most of the story. What’s more fascinating is how this city in flux came to be what it currently is, and where it’s going. Restaurants are one lens onto that."
 
On Townhouse, a new restaurant operating in the Dan Gilbert owned One Detroit Center, Miller writes:
 
"If this place opened in New York, it would be another clubby spot for the bridge-and-tunnel or finance crowd, but here it’s significant. There just aren’t many restaurants like this in central Detroit: somewhere to dress up and make an evening of dinner out, or to head to after an event for drinks and late-night snacks."
 
Miller also proves an astute observer of the culture of development that's on the rise in the city:
 
"For some, there’s a feeling that the era of opportunity in Detroit has already passed, but not for the group of fresh-faced Harvard Business School graduates whose barbecue I crashed one night. These young people, mostly transplants and recent arrivals, spoke quickly and excitedly, describing their real estate ventures with an intensity that contrasted with the laid-back Midwesterners I’d been chatting with until then."
 
Finally, she points out that Detroit's growing food scene isn't something that magically sprang from the ground, but rather something that is the result of a lot of people's hard work:
 
"Still, this kind of entrepreneurship often has to be pulled off creatively, since one of the great ironies in a city with so much vacant real estate is that mortgages and financing can be extremely difficult to come by. [Slows Bar B Q owner Philip] Cooley describes how it took a team effort to open his latest restaurant, nine-month-old Gold Cash Gold, down the street from Slows on Michigan Avenue. 'All of our friends with full-time jobs were willing to show up and start cleaning or sanding and still go to their 9-to-5’s,' he says."
 
Read more: Food Republic

Free Press explores Detroit's top 35 street art pieces


Detroit is a Mecca for street artists. That's part of the reason why Eastern Market-based 1xRun decided to host the upcoming 9-day mural festival called Murals in the Market, which will bring street artists from around the world to Detroit from Sept. 17-25.
 
Before they get here, however, take some time to explore what's already in Detroit. Start with this amazing feature by Detroit Free Press writer Mark Stryker and photographer/videographer Romain Blanquart, which lays out Detroit's top 35 street art pieces, from the Alley Project in southwest Detroit, to Charles McGee's untitled 1974 modernist mural in downtown Detroit, to the many pieces of the Grand River Creative Corridor, and more.
 
Enjoy!
 
Read more: Detroit Free Press

Write a House, Detroit's permanent writer's residency, announces 10 finalists

 
Last year, Write a House renovated a vacant house it had purchased at the Wayne County tax foreclosure auction, then gave it away to poet Casey Rocheteau -- for free. This year, Write a House will give a second formerly vacant house away to another worthy writer.
 
According to the organization's website, "Write a House is a twist on the 'Writer's Residency.' In this case, the writer is simply given the house, forever." The idea is to contribute to the neighborhood just north of Hamtramck (known to some as Banglatown) and strengthen the literary culture of Detroit.
 
This year, Write a House received 220 applications in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry from all over the United States and abroad, as well as right here in Detroit.
 
The finalists for this year's Write a House residency are:
 
Liana Aghajanian
Tujunga, CA
Nonfiction
http://www.lianaaghajanian.com
http://www.ianyanmag.com
@LianaAgh
 
Liana Aghajanian is an independent, Armenian-American journalist whose work explores the issues, people and places that remain hidden and on the fringes of society. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, The Guardian, Foreign Policy, BBC, Al Jazeera America, GOOD and The Atlantic among other publications. Reporting from Kenya, the UK, Germany, the South Caucasus and across the West Coast of the U.S., she covers issues at the intersection of culture, immigration, social justice, displacement and identity. She edits Ianyan Magazine, an independent-online journal on Armenia and its diaspora and authors a column for L.A. Times Community News on under-reported issues. Her work has received support from the Metlife Foundation Journalists in Aging Fellowship, the California Health Journalism Fellowship and the International Reporting Project at Johns Hopkins University.
 
Selected by dream hampton.
 
Glendaliz Camacho
New York, NY
Fiction
http://becomenzando.com
@Glendaliz

Glendaliz Camacho is a 2013 Pushcart Prize nominee, 2014 Jentel Foundation Artist in Residence, and 2015 Caldera Arts, Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, and Hedgebrook Artist in Residence. Glendaliz is an alum of the Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation Fiction Workshops. Her work appears in All About Skin: Short Fiction by Women of Color (University of Wisconsin Press), The Female Complaint: Tales of Unruly Women (Shade Mountain Press, 2015), The Butter, and Kweli Journal, among others. Glendaliz is currently working on a short story collection, fantasy novel, and essay collection.
 
“This piece surprised me the most of any of the submissions—it quickly drew rounded portraits of its characters and pulled me into their sure-to-be-tense relationship. More than any of the other pieces, I would have happily kept reading more.” Sean MacDonald

Katie Chase
Portland, OR
Fiction
www.katie-chase.com

Katie Chase's short fiction has appeared in The Missouri Review, Five Chapters, Narrative, Prairie Schooner, ZYZZYVA, Mississippi Review, and the Best American Short Stories and Pushcart Prize anthologies. A graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, she was the recipient of a Teaching-Writing Fellowship, a Provost’s Postgraduate Writing Fellowship, and a Michener-Copernicus Award. She has also been a fellow of the MacDowell Colony and the Center for Steinbeck Studies at San José State University. Born and raised outside Detroit, she lives currently in Portland, Oregon. Her first book is forthcoming from A Strange Object in 2016.

“Devil’s Night is an oft-explored theme, and yet this felt fresh, compelling, and true. Wasn’t really sure what to make of the last paragraph, but it held me nonetheless.” Toby Barlow

Allison Hedge Coke
Arcadia, OK
Poetry
http://www.hedgecoke.com
http://allisonhedgecoke.com
http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/allison-adelle-hedge-co
 
Allison Adelle Hedge Coke's authored books include Dog Road Woman, Off-Season City Pipe, Blood Run, Streaming, and Rock Ghost, Willow, Deer (memoir), and anthologies she edited, including: Sing: Poetry of the Indigenous Americas, Effigies and Effigies II. She also performs with the band Rd Kla. Hedge Coke came of age working fields, factories, and waters, and serves as an alternative field mentor. Awards for her work include an American Book Award, a Paterson Prize, a Sioux Falls Mayor’s Award, and residencies with MacDowell, Black Earth Institute, Hawthornden Castle, Weymouth Center, Center for the Great Plains, and Lannan at Marfa. Hedge Coke directs the annual Literary Sandhill Crane Retreat and is currently at work on an environmental documentary film, “Red Dust: resiliency in the dirty thirties.”

“(In her work), there is seriousness and ambition and scope for growth. It is densely packed and is mostly story-telling, anchored in a myth of blue-collar world. This is worth exploring.”  Michael Stone-Richards
 
Nandi Comer
Detroit, MI
Poetry
@NandiComer

Nandi Comer is the lead writer for Techno Poetics, a collaboration between Detroit music makers and writers. She has received fellowships from Indiana University, Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, Cave Canem, Callaloo, and Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. Her poems and essays have appeared or are forthcoming in To Light a Fire: 20 Years with the InsideOut Literary Arts Project (Wayne State University Press, 2014), A Detroit Anthology (Belt Publishing, 2014), Another and Another: An Anthology From the Grind Daily Writing Series (Bull City Press, 2012), Callaloo, Crab Orchard Review, Green Mountains Review, Southern Indiana Review, and Sycamore Review. She lives and works in Detroit.

“This poet plays with poetic form and verbal music in such a way that art amplifies social consciousness, violence, and cultural inheritance. This is the hallmark of literature that aims high, a kind of redemption song … I admire the maturity evident in this poets' work.”  Major Jackson
 
Jaquira Díaz
Miami, FL
Fiction
http://www.jaquiradiaz.com
@JaquiraDiaz
 
Jaquira Díaz is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, a Florida Individual Artist Fellowship, the Carl Djerassi Fiction Fellowship from the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, a Bread Loaf waitership, and an NEA Fellowship to the Hambidge Center for the Arts. She's been awarded fellowships or scholarships from the Sewanee Writers' Conference, The MacDowell Colony, Summer Literary Seminars, and the Tin House Writers' Workshop. A finalist for the Richard J. Margolis Award in journalism, her work is noted in Best American Essays 2012 and 2014, Best American Nonrequired Reading 2014, anthologized in Pushcart Prize XXXVII: Best of the Small Presses, and appears in Ploughshares, The Kenyon Review, The Sun, The Southern Review, Salon, Five Chapters, TriQuarterly, The Rumpus, and The Los Angeles Review of Books, among other publications.   
 
“The author has a strong sense of voice and language that drives these three short pieces. Even in the single paragraph that is ‘December’, the language has a natural cadence and sense of urgency that propels the narrative in two lyrical sentences. ‘Seasons of Risks’ captures the adolescent appetite for danger.” Tamara Warren
 
Matthew Fogarty
Columbia, SC
Fiction
www.matthewfogarty.com
@ThatMattFogarty

Born and raised in the square-mile suburbs of Detroit, Matthew Fogarty has an MFA from the University of South Carolina, where he was editor of Yemassee. He also edits Cartagena, a literary journal. His fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in such journals as Passages North, Fourteen Hills, PANK, Smokelong Quarterly, and Midwestern Gothic. His short story collection, Maybe Mermaids and Robots are Lonely, will be published in Fall 2016 by Stillhouse Press, a publisher based at George Mason University.

“The first two shorts in this packet were the most interesting, in part because they're so different. The first tells of a man obsessed with telling and retelling the story of Pope John Paul II being elected, but the story varies wildly depending on the day, and ‘depending on what we'd eaten and how much he'd had to drink.’ The second is a more absurd story about two con artists staging fake accidents for cash, while traveling under the names of characters from The Legend of Zelda. There's a lot of varied imagination here, and I appreciated the range.” Matt Bell

J.M. Leija
Detroit, MI
Nonfiction
@j3mleija

J.M. Leija is a Detroiter at heart and proud to claim all the accompanying trials, travails, and joys that accompany such a statement. By day she is a teacher/disguised superhero who tries to convince her students that reading is cool. On nights and weekends, she turns into a writer who tortures herself over whether writing about things that have really happened and people who really exist can ever be truly ethical. She then proceeds to write about them anyway. Her work has previously been featured in A Detroit Anthology, Motif's Seeking It's Own Level anthology, and Pithead Chapel Magazine, and she has work forthcoming in the 3288 Review.

“This is a person who has something interesting to say, and in saying it, she exercises complete command of the language. The words do exactly what she wants them to at all times. This is no mean feat. There’s an ease and authority here that was unmatched in any of the other submissions I read. … this #1 lady is a writer. There is an instinctive understanding of how words fit and rhythm and le mot juste. This is the thing that can’t be taught.” Nancy Kaffer

M. Sophia Newman
Homewood, IL
Nonfiction
http://www.msophianewman.com
@msophianewman

M. Sophia Newman is a writer whose work has been published in the US, UK, Bangladesh, and Japan. She writes a column on global health, Health Horizons, for Next City. She's reported on infectious disease in West Africa via a crowd-funded project for Pacific Standard Magazine and on violence in South Africa and America with the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting. She received a 2014 Shannon Fellowship from Bellarmine University’s International Thomas Merton Society to report on environmentalism, and continued this work with a 2015 retreat at Collegeville Institute for Cultural and Ecumenical Studies. Prior to journalism, she completed a Critical Language Scholarship in Bangla (2011), followed by a year of health research as a Fulbright fellow in Bangladesh (2012-2013). She holds a bachelor of science in cell and molecular biology (Tulane, 2009) and a master's degree in public health from University of Illinois (2012). Sophia is a Bangla speaker who hopes to attain fluency for journalism and to translate Bangla-language literature. She has also won admission to a short program on global mental health at Harvard, and intends to complete a nonfiction book expanding on the violence prevention she explored via the Pulitzer grant.

Selected by dream hampton.
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/rkJwZGgtp_bzroGFLZ31m9PAEwfvboo4nEEeaJtG1vIBV04p8nu1uYwrcp_G_utup_wetrM1N4XT3wF42XiTyGW03M52XiYTBFocxQB-MBofMMs8jJPr_kNWGGN3iziHlAg98Dg
Katie Nichol
Fayetteville, AR
Poetry
http://www.nwaprisonstories.com/

Katie Nichol is a poet, educator, and activist based in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Recent work has appeared in Cream City Review, St. Petersburg Review, and Cannibal. She is the Creative Writing Director for Prison Story Project, and was a 2014 finalist for the Wisconsin Institute Creative Writing Fellowships. Prior to receiving her MFA from the University of Arkansas, Katie worked as an advocate with homeless youth in Minneapolis/St. Paul.
 
“Like many of the manuscripts, this one deals with strong subject matter—notes from a rough life—but here the matter is balanced with literary grace and a knowledgeable sense of form.  The manuscript includes a ghazal and a rather amazing poem that reads forwards and backwards.” Billy Collins

Job sprawl a major problem for Detroit residents

In a recent story for the Detroit News, Mike Wilkinson of Bridge Magazine confirmed what many Detroiters already knew: that there aren't enough jobs in the city of Detroit for its residents. The immensity of this problem, however, is shocking.
 
According to Wilkinson, "80 percent of city residents live more than 10 miles from a central business district, one of the highest rates of the country." On the whole, Detroit has approximately 200 jobs per 1,000 residents, which is significantly worse than other cities, even those also located in the Rust Belt. Cleveland, for example, has an about 481 jobs per 1,000 residents.
 
The problem is particularly bad on the city's west side, where there is less than one job for every 10 people.
 
Wilkinson points to poor public transportation systems as a major challenge to solving the jobs sprawl problem.
 
Read more: Detroit News
 

Lafayette Park receives National Historic Landmark status

 
The largest collection of buildings by famed German architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe is located in Detroit's Lafayette Park neighborhood just east of downtown. Architecture buffs and local residents long have held the neighborhood in high esteem, and now so does the U.S. Department of the Interior, which designated the neighborhood a National Historic Landmark earlier this month.
 
"Lafayette Park is Michigan's 41st National Historic Landmark and one of only 2,564 nationwide," writes Dan Austin of the Detroit Free Press.
 
While Lafayette Park is cited as a shining example of Mid-Century Modernist architecture, the neighborhood's origins are controversial.
 
Writes Austin:
 
"The Housing Act of 1949 ushered in the urban renewal programs of the 1950s by giving cities federal money to acquire and clear neighborhoods that were considered slums. And Lafayette Park was the first large-scale clearance urban renewal project in the country, taking out the city's Black Bottom neighborhood. This was one of the poorest areas in the city and home to a large number of African Americans. Their ramshackle homes were razed to make way for the gleaming modern towers that were inhabited by wealthier people."
 
Nonetheless, Lafayette Park has remained a racially integrated neighborhood since its construction, and its townhouse residences are some of the most sought after pieces of real estate in the city.
 
Read more: Detroit Free Press

Detroit rolls out new parking technology, new rates for some areas

The days of parking at a dead meter and praying you won't be ticketed are nearing an end in Detroit. Over the next two weeks, the city will be rolling out its new parking system, ParkDetroit, by installing new meters throughout the city.
 
ParkDetroit represents a major advancement in parking technology for the city. The archaic hodgepodge of coin-operated meters and rarely-functioning kiosks that accept credit cards will be replaced with new stations that allow motorists to pay with cash, credit card, or via a mobile app (available for Android and iPhones). Drivers will need to know their license plate and parking zone numbers in order to pay at a station.
 
Accompanying the change in technology is a change in Detroit's parking ordinance. On Tuesday, July 28, Detroit City Council unanimously voted to amend the ordinance to establish a variety of parking rates for different sections of the city. While rates will remain the same in most neighborhoods ($0.25 per 15 minutes, or $1 per hour), several areas will see modest increases, such as Eastern Market and Midtown (now $1.50 per hour) and the central business district ($2 per hour).
 
Detroit's chief operating officer Gary Brown told the Detroit News that the city will only issue "courtesy tickets" while new meters are being installed to help raise awareness of the new system.
 
Read more: Detroit News

18th annual tour of Detroit gardens and farms to showcase city as capital of urban ag


Of all the remarkable statistics concerning vacant land in the city of Detroit, the fact that the city is home to over 1,400 urban gardens and farms sticks out. That's more than 10 gardens/farms per each of the city's 139 square miles. According to Keep Growing Detroit, an organization that promotes the development of a food sovereign city, this volume of gardens and farms has made Detroit "our nation's capital of urban agriculture."
 
On Wednesday, August 5, Keep Growing Detroit will celebrate this fact when it hosts its 18th annual tour of a selection of the city's urban farms and gardens. Participants will be able to travel by bicycle or bus along three routes, each with stops at roughly three gardens. Tours depart from Eastern Market's Shed 3 at 6 p.m. and last approximately two hours, concluding with a meal made from Detroit produce and prepared by local chefs. The tour fee is sliding scale $15 to $100. The tour is valued at $50 a person.
 
To sign up for a tour, visit Eventbrite.

Sick of potholes, Hamtramckans take to the streets with shovels and cold patch


Michigan's roads are in bad -- frankly deplorable -- shape. And thanks to budget cuts, inaction by the state legislature, and voters' unwillingness to approve a tax hike to pay for repairs, our surfaces streets are going to continue to deteriorate for the foreseeable future.
 
But in Hamtramck, a group of residents fed up with the status quo have decided to take matters – and shovels – into their own hands to improve road conditions in their community.
 
According to Dustin Block of MLive Detroit, "a group of six residents purchased 900 pounds of cold pack and spent the morning filling potholes along Lumpkin Street" on Saturday, July 25. The group hopes to raise $5,000 via a Go Fund Me campaign to pay for additional materials to fix other Hamtramck streets.
 
Read more: MLive Detroit

Urban Bean Co., a Capitol Park stalwart, looks for help to modernize equipment

 
Capitol Park is one of the hottest areas in downtown Detroit. The neighborhood, which is home to some of downtown's oldest and most inspired architecture, is seeing the development of high-end apartments and arrival of new businesses at rates unheard of in recent decades.
 
Before Capitol Park's current boom began, however, Josh Greenwood was making a big investment in the future of the neighborhood. He started renovating his space on the northwest corner of Grand River and Griswold in 2005. By 2008, he was finally able to open the Urban Bean Co., only to see it close shortly thereafter, a victim of the national economic downturn.
 
In 2013, however, Greenwood and a new partner were able to re-open the shop.
 
Today, as new competition moves into the neighborhood, Greenwood and the Urban Bean Co. are hoping to secure a crowd-funded, interest free Kiva Zip loan of $5,000 to modernize its equipment and remain competitive with national chains.
 
"Now other organizations are looking to move in, which is great," writes Greenwood on Urban Bean Co.'s Kiva ZIp page. "But as an independent retailer, we need to upgrade to compete to stay in this neighborhood."
 
According to Kiva Zip, "Repayments on the borrower’s loan will be in monthly installments of $208.33 over a period of 24 months. The first payment will be due from the borrower one month after the loan has been fully funded and the funds have been disbursed to the borrower.
 
At the time of this writing, Urban Bean Co.'s loan is 67 percent funded.
 
Read more: Kiva Zip

Can Greece learn from Detroit's example?

While some publications are comparing Detroit to Brooklyn (or at least pointing out how a handful of ex-Brooklynites are finding opportunity in the Motor City), CityLab sees a similarity between Detroit and Greece, the most financially distressed member or the Eurozone.
 
"For all sorts of reasons, a comparison between Greece and Detroit falls short of useful…" writes CityLab's Kriston Capps. "But the coming debate in Greece may nevertheless echo Detroit on the one point: How can Greece afford not to sell off cultural assets when people are suffering?
 
Capps points to the so-called "Grand Bargain" of Detroit's bankruptcy that saved the Detroit Institute of Arts' world class collection from being auctioned to satisfy the demands of creditors as an example Greece's leaders should study as they consider selling cultural artifacts for which the country is famous.
 
Read more: CityLab
 

RIP Park Avenue Hotel, 1924-2015

 
For 91 years, the 13-story Park Avenue Hotel stood tall in the lower Cass Corridor neighborhood of downtown Detroit, an outer extremity of the city's skyline. The building, once a luxury hotel that eventually went vacant in 2003, was imploded on Saturday, July 11, to make way for the loading dock of a new hockey arena currently under construction in the neighborhood.
 
Read more about the building's 91-year history on HistoricDetroit.org, then watch the building crumble in seconds on the Detroit Free Press.

YouthfulCities seeks Detroit research fellow

What makes a city "youthful"?
 
According to YouthfulCities, a global initiative to rank the world’s top 100 cities from a youth perspective, a city's youthfulness is more nuanced than just the number of young people living there.
 
YouthfulCities, which is based in Toronto, ranks cities in terms of 20 urban attributes important to youth. Those attributes are determined by surveying people ages 15 to 29 in 75 large cities around the world. The initiative claims that its survey is "one of the biggest surveys of urban youth ever."

Last year, Detroit ranked 25th out of 55 cities for youth aged 15-29, finishing ahead of Moscow, Miami, Johannesburg and Shanghai on the index.
 
To help create its latest index of youth-friendly cities, YouthfulCities is hiring research fellows in cities around the world, including Detroit. Interested in becoming Detroit's YouthfulCities research fellow? Here's what you need to know:
 
Each fellow is expected to collect 1,000 responses to YouthfulCities' Urban Attitudes Survey from their city. Fellows will also add their own qualitative research to build a picture of youth in their city. Fellows will be compensated with a stipend and a free trip to the 2016 YouthfulCities Summit (location and exact date to be determined).
 
The deadline to apply for the YouthfulCities Detroit fellowship is Sunday, July 12.
 
For more details about the fellowship, click here.
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