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Urban Farming

Where some people might see a fallow, empty lot, others see potential -- not only for fruits and vegetables, but for a rebirth of the city. Can Detroit turn around on the backs of climbing beans and tomato plants? Maybe not, but urban farming will likely play an important role either way.

Urban Farming Features

Malik Yakini

A co-op for the people: The rocky process of developing the Detroit People's Food Co-op

The Detroit People's Food Co-op will have a cooperatively owned grocery store, a 50-seat cafe, incubator kitchen, and be in an underserved neighborhood of the city. But it took seven long years to bring this project to fruition. 

Nicole Lindsey holds a brood comb frame loaded with honeybees

Detroit's vacant lots find new life from a surprising source: Bees

Founded earlier this year, Detroit Hives hopes to eliminate blight in the city by repurposing vacant lots, promoting honey bee conservation, and educating the community about bee farming and the benefits of honey bees.

Jerry Hebron

Video: Oakland Avenue Urban Farm's Jerry Hebron explains what her farm means to the community

The farm not only grows produce for wholesale at the weekly farmers market, but also hosts all kinds of community events, like music performances and workshops.

Jordan Polk

Gardening for personal growth: Detroit's youth gardening programs do much more than build skills

Community, healthy living, and sustainability are common themes among youth gardening programs in the city of Detroit—programs that engage young people in a conversation about how to change themselves and the places they live.

Carla Underwood

Michigan Nightlight Voices: What I learned as a 10th grader about the food system in Detroit

The youth program at the Detroit Food Policy Council teaches students about the local and national food economy through interactive trips and activities. Carla Underwood writes about her eye-opening experience in the program. 
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